Berelson's Theory Of Democracy

Better Essays
Berelson et. al. introduces the idea that we struggle to live up to an ideal political society. He states that we are influenced by the behavior put forth from the government. His main claim is that there is a main impact of realistic research in contemporary politics which need further requirements to have traditional normative arguments. Berelson brings up small situations in where an average democratic should possess certain qualities. Theses qualities should then determine how they should act in out system of government in the United States. His reason for gives example of how and what a democratic should behave shows how, in reality, uninformed our society is in making long lasting political decisions. His first example is that the average …show more content…
He states “in order for the democratic system to work, we need to practice discussion…” He states that discussions between political candidates and its potential voters leads to moral understanding of how much their vote counts in the political government. The relationship between the candidates, representatives, and voters in debates and discussion does actually heavily influence how knowledgeable the voter will be in making their decision. He also states that there is an assumption in the underlying of the theory of democracy. This theory is that citizens actually possess a strong motivation for participation in their political life. Berelson attempts to prove this theory through examples dealing with knowledge, principle, and rationality. He states an example of being knowledgeable in where an average citizen is expected to know the issues, policies, history, facts, party facts, alternatives and consequences in order to make an effective voting decision. This makes the vote more of worth and more factual in the sense that the voter knows exactly what they are getting themself into. Berelson claims that the average voter uses more of their …show more content…
Political Socialization is the process of how individuals acquire their knowledge on political beliefs and values. We obtain these skills better in our childhood rather than our adulthood. In addition, there is a significant numbers of contributing agents that affect how a person identifies with their political views. Agents such as family, peers, school, race, age, and religion play big roles. These all focus of the basis of American ideals and their native ideals. The idea of “being apart of a group” illuminate the fact that Americans tend to be bandwagons when it comes to politics. To relate this to the agents of political socialization, family is one of the first factors you are introduced with in how you shape your political views as a child. Studies have shown how most citizens don’t know how to vote correctly only because they feel as if they don't know enough information to make sensible decisions. Citizens often vote according to how closely they relate to their race, gender, and partisanship of the potential

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Even though time separated Herman and Chomsky and Plato, they all noticed how the information systems present in their society are used to shape and mold the public consciousness. They both identify specific roles in the society that are a part of this: the masses/public, the shadow-makers/media, the rulers/powerful societal interests, and the philosophers/critics. While both philosophers see the public being manipulated, they disagree on how to fix this problem and who should be in control of the government. Herman and Chomsky suggest that democracy is the best way to rule for a government. On the contrary, Plato believes that the public is the problem and that democracy should be avoided as a way to rule a government and that a small group…

    • 1870 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Political campaigns play a crucial role in the democratic and electoral processes. Political campaigns are a source of high interaction between politicians and citizens. The main goal of the political party is to get elected and gain power, and they need citizen’s support to do so, which they obtain through campaigning. How informative campaigns are, who funds them, and the media’s coverage of them are all key factors as to how campaigns help democratic governance. First, campaigns undeniably help voters learn about politics, and what’s happening in the world around them.…

    • 1649 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It is human nature to naturally be evil and we must have government to maintain and regulate society, in order to prevent citizens from trumping others rights. Ideologies is a “prescription for society based on personal values.” A truly objective political ideology is almost impossible, but if it can be sensitive to the individual and best promotes their cooperation towards mutual ends. Ronald Reagan was a modern conservative who proposed many changes to how he thought…

    • 1738 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Political parties are a main key to any democracy. They are the means by which people come together to campaign, state their wants and needs, and state what they aspire for their community. Whilst there are political parties without democracy, there can be no democracy without political parties. When they function correctly , political parties cultivate common ideas within a notable group in order to place pressure upon the political system. Citizens may be divided over interests, rulers, or policies and political parties arrange these differences, which helps reach compromise.…

    • 1069 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In order to gain our own influence among decision-makers, we must be part of the motivations for bureaucratic groups. While states do seem to follow relationships they have internalized, the state is not one unitary actor, but rather several interest groups competing for the solution they want to be implemented by the state. Rather than individuals, the groups they are a part of are more influential, especially in giving information to the public, who can greatly help or hinder the elite’s decision making. If Imaginia can gain positive opinion by both bureaucracies and the public, we have a better chance of influencing American foreign policy to our…

    • 1507 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Political socialization is important when discussing political culture, because depending how an individual is introduced in to government and politics greatly impacts the individual’s perception of political culture. In addition to political socialization, public opinion is also important. Public opinion is a cornerstone in democracy; it is the collective expression of attitudes about the prominent issues and actors of the day. It’s what the common consensus is on major events and opinions on popular people of the time. Public opinion is important when it comes the political culture, because other people’s opinions and political cultures’ can influence his or her own political…

    • 1067 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The short answer is that state has the power to make institutional change, and actors on the ground can help create a façade of changing democratic practise through deliberation in the process of power. This satisfies in the simple context of the deliberative process: it is necessary to pass the ‘governance’ role on to members of from parliament, NGO’s and civil society. This empowerment however, should not be taken for granted. Then, we must question, what are the politics which led us…

    • 1198 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It is our country’s democracy that allows us to vote for our beliefs. Therefore by voting, we are voicing our opinions on how we think the government should operate. So, it is very important…

    • 1008 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Compulsory voting does not guarantee a true reflection of the majority. In a free society, everyone ought to be free to decide whether to take part on Election Day. Dissatisfaction of candidates competing in the election is also a persuasive motive for many perspective voters to simply stay home. A law that forces Americans to vote will in turn lead politicians to blame the voters for any bad government there is for the sole reason that it was the voters choice to put them in…

    • 760 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Understanding the distinctive characteristics of democracy, O’Connell helps the reader to understand there the significant difference between civil society in the United States and other countries. Based on his interactions with individuals from various countries, he concludes “there is a universal hunger for participation and influence within one’s own surrounding [...]” and “effective societies exist in direct proportion to their degree of citizen participation and influence” (O’Connell, 5-6). Specifically, in the United States, citizens expect rights to be granted along with fairness and justice in social exchanges; however, O’Connell argues that if Americans continue to take such liberations for granted, the potential strength of democracy will inevitably weaken. Suggesting that citizens take full advantage of their liberties, O’Connell highlights the significant role of the nonprofit sector within civil society. In this chapter, the nonprofit sector is identified as a buffer zone designed to enhance democracy through encouraging independent citizen initiative outside the government and personal commitment to service.…

    • 1006 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays