Analysis Of Batter My Heart

Great Essays
Defining and scrutinizing poetry is always difficult because of its poetic elements and chosen words. Through these elements, poems are usually difficult to comprehend. However, understanding poems can be entertaining and captivating because of the romantic structures and powerful emotions. One example is John Donne’s “Batter my heart, Three-Personed God.” This holy sonnet explores the emotions of the speaker as he talks to the three-personed God, which is the Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit. He wants to feel these three important personas in his life in an intense manner through battering. In the presentation of the concept of battering in relation to the speaker’s religious perspectives and emotions, this interesting sonnet demonstrates …show more content…
He asks the Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit to batter his chest or heart in order to enter his soul. Instead of the God’s traditional way of seeking refuge from a person’s heart with a simple knock or breathe, the speaker wants to be “battered” in order to feel the three-personed God. He even asks God to treat him violently for him to feel His presence because he feels that he is belonged to someone else and he needs the three-personed God to help and save him from distress and imprisonment. The speaker wants to show his faith to God, but his imprisonment from the ownership of evil keeps him from doing it, and this is the reason why he wants God to batter him. The speaker pleas to God to save him and takes him away from evil for he loves God more than anything. He asks to be untied in order to become free and renew his faith with …show more content…
Classical poetry focuses on image, the structure and form of image, which is shown in Donne’s poem. According to the speaker, “I, like an usurped town to another due, / Labor to admit You, but Oh, to no end! / Reason, Your viceroy in me, me should defend, / But is captived, and proves weak or untrue” (Donne 5-8). This is a strong depiction of the character’s thoughts about faith. He wants God to become violent towards him—not to hurt him, but to free him from imprisonment. The speaker is captivated by evil, and he wants God to batter his heart to free his soul. This description shows that classical poetry is traditional, but intellectual. The poet does not use simple words to express the speaker’s perspectives, but profound statements to declare the speaker’s desire for freedom. From this sense, it can be said that classicism includes representation of images. In Hawthorne’s story, imageries are common and obvious, like nature. Nature is one of the most significant themes in “Young Goodman Brown” because everything happens in the forest. In the first paragraph of the text, the narrator says, “Young Goodman Brown came forth at sunset into the street at Salem village; but put his head back, after crossing the threshold, to exchange a parting kiss with his young wife. And Faith, as the wife was aptly named, thrust her own pretty head into the street, letting the

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