Analysis Of B. Johnson's BC Johnson, God And The Problem Of Evil '

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Johnson carefully assesses many different “excuses” that theists give for why an all good, all powerful god approves or neglects to prevent the burning of an innocent baby. I believe his weakest “excuse” is when he claims that a baby going to heaven is only justified if it was necessary for the baby to suffer. If it was not, then it was wrong to allow it. I believe this is Johnsons weakest point because I feel as there is never a necessary reason for a baby’s death.
Throughout Johnson’s passage, BC Johnson, God and the Problem of Evil, he contends that it is far-fetched that God (if for beyond any doubt God exists) is all great. He proceeds by depicting the issue of wickedness, explaining common theistic views, and then gives his own view to the theistic responses. Johnson illustrates the issue of evilness by asking his readers to consider the case of a newborn baby caught
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For instance, John Hicks view. John Hick believes that in every universe evilness is inevitable. Evilness is needed because in our universe we have set laws or rules that were constructed that must be followed, therefore it would be hard or even impossible for God to interfere with the everyday life. Hick would argue Johnsons overall argument by saying in order for God to save the burning baby, God would have to interfere with our set rules which would contradict the science of free will. Free will basically paves the road for God to allow mankind to learn by right or wrong, but if God saves the baby from the burning building we are not necessarily learning from certain mistakes. Since mankind has the free will to make wrong decisions, evilness will run its course. In conclusion, Hick is saying in order for God to be who he is portrayed as, evilness must exist. If evilness did not exist, then mankind would not have free will and therefore, our universe as we see it today would not exist the way it does (The Soul-Making

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