Mao's Deviation Essay

Good Essays
Discussion and analysis
3.1 Comparison of factors
On the surface, Mao followed many aspects of Marxist’s communist theory. This are especially seen in the aspects of the abolition of the bourgeoisie, elimination of private property. In this section, I will be focusing more on the areas of deviation.
Aspect Marx Mao Deviated?
Social Classes Removal of bourgeoisie Eradication of 4 classes No
Abolishment of private property Land to be redistributed
Collectivization Land redistributed + collectivization Not at all
Education of the people Technical-orientated
Universal education

Incorporation of work into school Liberal arts discouraged
Compulsory education for all
Incorporation of work into school
Preferable choosing of cadres Minimal
Treatment
…show more content…
This is not in line with Marxist thought, where Marx emphasized for a “peaceful revolution if possible”. This deviation is due to Mao’s characteristic of using violence. There were multiple causes that could have led to such a characteristic or belief within Mao. Firstly, it is the fact that the history of China is tainted with one bloody revolution after another, establishing dynasty after dynasty. This could result in the mentality of using violence once again. This is ironic when seeing how Mao greatly looked down upon “old culture”. Secondly, is the circumstances of the situation. Take, for example, the Cultural Revolution. On the surface, Mao called for the saving of the communist ideology as it was being threatened. However, it was a tool used by Mao to get himself back into power. In the face of the failed Great Leap Forward, he was getting increasingly sidelined by other members within the CCP, eventually threatening his loss of power. The Cultural Revolution targeted the revisionists, or anti-communists, which constituted multiple party members of the time who were sidelining Mao. It is for such a dire situation that Mao utilized his extreme influence of the people to turn them against his opponents. Hence, it can be said that Mao utilized the revolution for his own means, resulting in millions of death to keep him in perpetual …show more content…
This is in contrast to Mao’s multiple moves to establish a public cult of personality. This can be seen from the Cultural Revolution where 350 million copies of Mao’s little red book glorifying him and his ideology was printed by December 1967. In the autumn of 1966 Mao reviewed some 11 million ”Red Guards” in Peking, prior to their return to their home areas ”to spread the flames of the cultural revolution”. At the same time all the organs controlled by the counter-revolutionaries began to publish large photographs of Mao Tse-tung in every issue, he being described as “the great teacher, great leader, great supreme commander and helmsman...” Mao used his personality cult to launch the Cultural Revolution in the first place, and it was also his death that ended the movement. He transformed himself to become a godlike figure in his own country. While Mao was extremely popular during the Cultural Revolution, the ultimate underlying aim was still for him to consolidate his power, his personality is once again another tool for his manipulation for his personal

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    This was because Chiang’s Nationalist government angered both the peasants and middle class due to the government’s inability to solve economic problems and rising inflation. As many Chinese became less optimistic, many turned to the CCP as a new hope of opportunity that would mean a better future. As a result, those who once supported Chiang turned against him by siding with the CCP to overthrow him. 2. Why was President Truman criticized for his response to the communist revolution in China?…

    • 734 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In order to combat economic disorder caused by the Great Leap Program, Liu Shaoqi attained his rank as the new Chairman of RPC while Deng Xiaoping became the CPC General Secretary. In order to reassert his authority after the failure of the Great Leap Forward, Mao Zedong seeked to have elements of Chinese culture and identity destroyed during the Cultural Revolution to create a new culture, which was very unsuccessful as it had only distorted China both…

    • 1131 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Red Scare Essay

    • 1116 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The Red Scare was a hysteria caused by the fear that communists, the “Reds”, will rise and take control over the United States of America in the 1900s. The first Red Scare began after World War I, when the communists in Russia, the Bolshevik, got rid of the royal family and took control over their nation. The fear of communism increased when several strikes led by industrial workers and policemen happened in 1919. Communists were always blamed, especially when a bomb was dropped to purposely kill A. Mitchell Palmer, who was the Attorney General of America. Fearing that the communists will impose their ideas and overthrow their government, one of the top goals of most Americans was to get rid of all communists and their supporters that lived…

    • 1116 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    At first, Ah-Q does not support the rebels. The narrator states, “back then, he had an intuition – why, he couldn’t say – that these revolutionaries were rebelling against the established order of things, and that rebellion would make his life difficult; and so head conceived a violent hatred for them.” However, Ah-Q quickly changes his attitude towards the rebellion and sees it as an opportunity to settle his many grievances. The narrator says, “’Hurrah for revolution!’ Ah-Q thought. It’ll do for the whole rotten lot of them!...I’m going over to the revolutionaries as soon as I get the chance.’” Holcombe describes the Chinese willingness to enter the rebellion in a similar way by saying, “Chinese people suddenly awoke to the idea that they were conquered subjects of “foreign” Manchus. Ending Manchu rule became the first priority of the new Chinese nationalism.” Both Ah-Q and the Chinese people entered into the rebellion without much forethought or planning.…

    • 1537 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Many sought to detect, seize and punish party members who had demonstrated these capitalist traits. In 1965 the Cultural Revolution was designed by Mao specifically to reconsolidate power, undermining the positions of Liu and Deng, as well as to reimpose his beliefs on the nation by eradicating the ‘Four Olds’ – old culture, habits, ideas and customs. Denunciation of anyone who was seemingly superior was encouraged: teachers, economists, writers, intelligentsia, and allies of Liu Shao Qi. (Cairns, 2012) Mao sought to create a cult for himself and to purge anyone who did not support him. He desired to create a classless society in China.…

    • 1790 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Conservative Movement

    • 1249 Words
    • 5 Pages

    According to the Conservative Movement, Communism was seen as a threat to America and the rest of world, and conservatives saw liberal foreign policy on Communism as weak and wanted to change US’s foreign policy to be more aggressive. Finally, the last concern of the Conservative movement was the continuance and protection…

    • 1249 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However, in 1962 Mao lost power and therefore he started to plan a massive revolution to overthrow the Capitalists who took him away from ruling China. Therefore, he put together a peasant army called the Red Guardians that would purge the “undesirables” (“Mao Tse-Tung Biography”). This resulted in another mass killing of many people in China and truly showed how strong Mao really was. As Mao said, “What’s so unusual about Emperor Shih Huang of the China…

    • 1224 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Zedong, in order to strengthen his political power, rallied youths and called them the “Red Guards.” Their job was to punish people who were involved with the failure of the Great Leap Forward. Religious texts and architecture was burned in the process. It was called the Cultural Revolution. It was another attempt of Zedong’s to change the Chinese way of thinking. Eventually, this reform also failed and China was damaged once again.…

    • 1359 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Mao's Cultural Revolution

    • 1331 Words
    • 6 Pages

    However, in Mao’s determination to make China ideologically “pure”, he had let China descend into chaos. After the Cultural Revolution, people’s mindsets towards communism began to change and people began to make use of their newfound political freedom. Over the course of Mao’s rule, the people began to see the consequences of a strictly Communist and totalitarian government and society. The Red Guards, militias made up of young people loyal to Mao, began to heap abuse and humiliation upon those who were accused of having the slightest capitalist values. These violent sessions usually ended in torture, death, or the accused being kept away in a reeducation camp for years.…

    • 1331 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This fight will end in one of the two ways: a revolutionary reconstitution of society or in the ruin of contending classes. In such a ruin, we see that those who fail to own the means of production are oppressed. The bourgeois and proletariat have opposing interests. The bourgeois want to maintain the status quo whereas the proletariat yearns for a reorganization of society. This reorganization will make it that production benefits collectively as a whole.…

    • 2725 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Decent Essays