Analysis Of Anthony M. Daniels 'What We Have To Lose'

1321 Words 6 Pages
Anthony M. Daniels is a doctor and a writer who was born in London in 1949. He was raised by his German mother and Russian father. Throughout his life, he traveled around the world to learn more about the nature of the world he lives in. At times, the writing he published went against the views of the government of the country he was in. Additionally, he also used his patients as an example in his texts. So, in order to protect himself and his patients’ privacy, Daniels used pseudonym throughout his career. In 1994, Daniels started publishing his writings as Theodore Dalrymple, and one of the essays that were published by Daniels using the name T. Dalrymple was What We Have to Lose. He writes this essay after the 9/11 attack at New York, as …show more content…
The author makes use of rhetorical questions to get the reader to start thinking about the idea of barbarism and civilization. The author introduces the violence in the destruction of the two twin towers using rhetorical question such as: “What was the point of finishing so laboriously insignificant a task as mine?” Through the use of rhetorical question like the one above, the author gets the reader to think about the significance of the act of barbarism that has occurred. The author goes as far as to suggest that one’s laborious work is insignificant compared to the act of barbarism that has occurred. This gets the readers to give serious consideration to barbaric situation. Few paragraphs later, the author again makes the use of rhetorical question. This time, the author uses it with his example of Myra Hess to bring attention to the need to defend the civilization. The author describes how Myra, a Jewish, is playing music on an opponent’s land during a time of a war. Then, he uses rhetorical question such as “What is the point of playing Mozart…” to get the reader to think about the significance of Myra’s action. This gets the reader to think about how Myra’s action was a “defiant gesture of” civilization. Here, the author sets the reader up to think about the significance of civilization. Overall, through the use of rhetorical …show more content…
Many people think that humans are very civilized and that the foundation of the civilization is very strong. To show them that the civilization is actually fragile, the author shows the extent of barbaric activities throughout the world. In the text, the author provides examples of barbaric situation from different parts of the world from England to Africa to Asia. When describing the violence in these areas, the author gives very specific details to show how bad the violence. One example of this is when the author describes the violence in Liberia. The author states the books in a university had been “piled into contemptuous heaps, many with pages torn from them or their spines deliberately broken.” Here, the author gives vivid description of the barbaric situation going on in Liberia. Books are the source of education for Human and many would say that the education is what makes humans civilized. So, by giving a vivid description of destruction of book, the author is able to get the reader to really think about how barbaric the world out there

Related Documents