The Angry Black Woman Analysis

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The “Angry Black women” is a term that black women across america have been hearing since arriving in America. Cited in “The Angry Black Woman: The Impact Of Pejorative Stereotypes On Psychotherapy With Black Women” by Ashley, Wendy. Ashley states “The “angry Black woman” mythology presumes all Black women to be irate, irrational, hostile, and negative despite the circumstances.” Now through my research, I’ve to notice a pattern in that black women are always shown as aggressive, angry, and just plain inhuman. As Ashley states the idea that the angry black women exist is just that, and idea or “myth”. It‘s a socially constructed ideology that helps keep black women from reaching their full potential and causes a lot of effects on the black …show more content…
The amygdala also responds to social interactions particularly. Ashley makes a strong point when she mentions how certain stimuli can cause certain reactions, specifically for the black women. “Certain stimuli can become associated in memory with a threat or feeling of danger. McRae (2003) indicates that women of color experience racism on an almost daily basis, therefore, racism constitutes a consistent social stressor for Black women“ (29). The feeling of danger is a feeling that has been instilled in black women for centuries. During the times of slavery, black women were broken to the point when the could no longer think or do for themselves. Stated in the letter written by Willie Lynch, “We reversed nature by …show more content…
As a result, the archaic illusion of color-blind therapy can be ameliorated and the psychological stress of being Black in America can be integrated into the biopsychosocial spiritual narrative of Black female clients. Only then can Black women be safe enough to be angry without fear of being characterized as angry Black women”(33).I’ve come to a conclusion, similar to Ashleys. That the angry black woman myth is just that a myth. It is clinical, a problem, that has evolved from many generations of distress that has socially controlled and compelled many people to believe it to be true. Which in term causes a lot of harm to black women as a group. The only way to treat the damage that has been done is to break down social barriers and eliminated the stress that comes with being black in

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