Andy Warhol's Brillo Boxes: Danto Analysis

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Danto initially felt that Andy Warhol’s art deprived of an artistic respectability. Due to Warhol’s subject matter, Danto considered his art to be unsophisticated and insignificant. Prior to Brillo Boxes Danto felt that Warhol’ art was a mere ‘copy’ of ordinary objects and that it lacked any significant meaning or value. After being exposed to Warhol’s Brillo Boxes, Danto’s perception and understanding of Warhol’s art was completely reconstructed and reversed. Danto detected that Warhol’s work did not just consists of art that merely symbolized an everyday object, but that there was in fact an intellectual motivation and commentary (Danto 1983).

By creating Brillo Boxes, Warhol was questioning what art is. Warhol used art as a vehicle for
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What Danto thinks about art is illustrated by Duchamp, who created art with the very intent of removing an aesthetic value from it. Duchamp did so in an attempt to demonstrate how art goes far beyond aesthetic. Duchamp art validates Danto’s notion that art is an aesthetic process, but an intellectual process, of which meaning and cognitive thought is deeply embedded within. What Danto thinks about art is supported by Duchamp’s art, which is categorized as art despite the fact that it is not aesthetically pleasing and that it shares similarities with that, which is non-art (Danto …show more content…
He claims that despite this, theories attempting to define art are not irrelevant as they help to build on understanding of what art is. Weitz maintains that the fact that art cannot be defined is evident in the way in which theories that attempt to do just that are disproven and improved by other theories in a continuous cycle. Furthermore, Weitz argues that what one theorist understands to be fundamental in defining art, another will understand to be irrelevant. The fact that these theories contradict each other does not mean to say that they are all false, but rather its supports Weitz’ claim that there is no single definition for art (Weitz

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