The Role Of PTSD In World War I

1485 Words 6 Pages
At the time, World War I was the deadliest and most destructive war the world ever experienced. Within the span of four years, more than 25 countries involved themselves in the war (“World War I”). All the soldier and civilians involved with the war experienced a great deal of trauma. Each individual deals with traumatic experiences differently; however, the war left a negative impact emotionally on a portion of those involved. They did not know it at the time, but these people suffered from a disorder called post-traumatic stress disorder, otherwise known as PTSD. Known by many names in the past, post-traumatic stress disorder presents itself throughout history and literature. Erich Maria Remarque captures the horrors of PTSD and exposes it …show more content…
People with PTSD suffer from intrusive symptoms when they keep thinking about the trauma again and again, sometimes unintentionally (Frey and Hodgkins; Poole 29; “Post-traumatic stress disorder”). His leave from the front lines prove to Paul that he cannot ignore the reality of the war happening. While many of the townspeople go about their day without thinking about war, Paul suffers constant reminders of it through ordinary noises at home. Paul admits to the readers that the ”screaming of the tram cars,” trigger a flashback to his time at war because the sound reminds him of artillery (Remarque 165). Sounds in everyday life trigger memories from the war making it difficult for soldiers to move on and continue their lives as they were before deployment (“Post-traumatic stress …show more content…
Support groups are often led by other veterans who experienced events similar to the members within the group. These organizations provide members with the company of others who they relate to ("Post-traumatic stress disorder"; Simpson 82). One form of therapy used on PTSD patients is cognitive processing therapy also known as CPT. This therapy helps patients get a better understanding of the trauma and their reactions to it. By becoming more aware of their reactions, CPT patients learn new ways of coping with their emotions. Another form of therapy, prolonged exposure therapy, involves talking therapy, relaxation exercises, and careful exposure to whatever causes PTSD symptoms to occur (Poole 37-39). Medication can be used as a treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder as well. Most commonly used for severe cases of PTSD, medications treat the intrusive symptoms of the disorder. Although drug prescriptions help sleep problems, anxiety, and depression, long-term usage leads to disturbing side effects such as increased anger, drug tolerance, dependence, and abuse. However, as of 2017, no medication is a primary cure of PTSD (Poole 40; "Post-traumatic stress disorder"; Simpson

Related Documents