Analysis Of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

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The title of Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is ironically a quote from another author. However, said author is the great Shakespeare. Huxley uses a line from Shakespeare’s The Tempest in a masterful way. John the Savage quotes the play’s line “O brave new world that has such people in it” (139). This simple phrase is not only a driving factor of the novel, but a philosophical adventure. John the Savage says these lines at first with hope and enthusiasm. His ideal world is at his hands, and he is excited to explore. The anticipation of the utopia leads John to quote his great knowledge of literature and Shakespeare. However, he later repeats the lines with bitter irony. His imagination contrasted significantly with the true values of the …show more content…
His use of the “brave new world” (139) quote gave life and purpose to his literature and his secondary agenda. With the use of Shakespeare, Aldous Huxley created a purposeful scholarly and historical direction for his novel. Huxley would not have been able to be successful had he not written a wonderful novel, but he knew that it had to have true meaning. His use of this quote allowed for the seamless connection between both aspects. Peter Edgerly Firchow would be the first to speak about the characters of Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. In his literature criticism, “The End of Utopia: A Study of Aldous Huxley 's ‘Brave New World,’” Firchow explains the creation and development of Huxley’s characters. He specifically writes about Bernard Marx and John the Savage, but he evaluates the non-main characters as …show more content…
His use of language is incredible, and his descriptions are beautiful. Huxley’s masterful subtlety is exemplified on the final page of Brave New World, when John the Savage is found dead. “‘Savage!’ Called the first arrivals… There was no answer… Just under the crown of the arch dangled a pair of feet… Slowly, very slowly, like two unhurried compass needles, the feet turned…” (259). Huxley’s style is summarized in a wonderful way throughout these

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