Analysis Of John Beck's Cognitive Therapy

In science, we often look for certainty. Physics and chemistry are a benchmark for science, offering concrete answers from the beginning. Psychology has never been privy to straightforward answers, solutions, or formulae for prediction. There aren’t as clear right answers - predictions take into account many factors, deal with immeasurable and abstract ideas, and work on a scale that can’t quite be defined - but the field has still strived towards new and better solutions to help people while trying to strike a balance between the concrete and the abstract. Some psychologists believe that there are “right” and “wrong” modes of thinking, outlining “rational” and “irrational” beliefs for REBT, for example. Cognitive Therapy, developed by Aaron …show more content…
Much in the same way that Sigmund Freud is viewed as an important founding figure in psychology as a whole, Beck’s cognitive therapy is an important groundwork for modern depression treatment strategies in general. In addition to this, some studies have shown that cognitive therapy has the potential to compete with pharmacotherapy, which utilizes medications to help depressed patients (DeRubeis, et al., 1999). It is a strong therapeutic technique with a wealth of advantages, namely its structured and methodical nature, its focus on the client’s internal schema, research support, and that it is designed with an expectation of termination- the client is intended to be out of therapy within a limited amount of time. It’s also still being expanded upon, with new models and research pertaining to schemas, attention, and other relevant psychological topics (Beck and Haigh, …show more content…
They may start by asking Johnny questions in the downward arrow technique such as: “What is the worst thing that could happen?” Johnny’s response seems to be that others would judge his appearance poorly. Continuing to ask this question, a likely potential belief could be that poor appearance in the eyes of his peers leads to less desire to interact with Johnny, less interaction could lead to him being alone with no friends- which may be his ultimate fear. Many of Johnny’s feared social interactions seem to share a common element: putting himself in a public situation where failure could possibly have social fallout in the terms of people getting upset with him, viewing him as unattractive, unintelligent, or otherwise a failure in various terms of social competence. From there, this fear/belief could be challenged or

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