Analysis Of A Thousand Splendid Suns, By Khaled Hosseini

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It is a conundrum to even fathom living a life of oppression in today’s age. We have become so accustom the perks of a free nation where we have the right to express ourselves without the limitations of race, gender or financial status that the thought of living alternatively is treated with hostility. If anyone tried to take your natural born rights from you, you would have your country’s support in terminating the tyrants of liberty who dare cross that line. But what if your country was in the midst of a war, simultaneously battling outside forcing wishing to take control of its land as well as an internal uprising amongst its own people, creating havoc for the civilians who reside peacefully within. Will the rights you were once entitled …show more content…
Hosseini, an Afghan refugee, experienced the horrors that the Soviet Union brought to his homeland when he was only fifteen years old. The communist government that was established by the Soviets lead to war leaving the innocent civilians of Afghanistan in danger of incoming missile strikes and raids. In an interview with The Indianapolis Star, Shari Rudvasky asked Hosseini about his memories of the time period and his family’s decision to relocate. Hosseini responded …show more content…
Girls were forbidden to attend school beyond the age of eight. After that the only book that they were allowed to study was the Quran. From now on women were forced to remain at home. They were allowed out only if they were accompanied by a male relative. Even then they had to be covered from head to foot in a restrictive item of clothing known as a Burka. Women were forbidden to wear high heel shoes and makeup, or talk loudly in public. Breaking the rules risked public beatings from the religious police, [and] more severe punishments such as having their fingertips chopped off for wearing nail varnish. All of this according to the Taliban was imposed to protect the modesty and virtue of women. But many of these women were widows, having lost their husbands in the long civil war. Now with no means of support, they were forced to beg, risking even further punishment by leaving their homes unaccompanied. (Martin,

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