Analysis Of A Nation Divided But Unified?

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A Nation Divided, but Unified When in the face of opposition, it is natural for people to band together, especially when said opposition is another whole group of people. In the case of African Americans, uniting to overcome barriers has become a repeated action throughout history. From the times of slavery, the Civil Rights Movement and the present day, black citizens have been forced to experience similar social torments. This uniform suffering has led to the development of a collective concern for a nationwide community. When their race is targeted for nothing more than merely skin color, African Americans share the resentment, and more importantly, the will to expunge the malice that faces them. With a rise in police profiling that has …show more content…
With racial issues mounting in the nation, 13 artists assembled to become the co-authors of The Game’s (2012-2014) song, “Don’t Shoot.” Although rapper collaborations are usually the results of profit-driven record deals, The Game pioneered lyrics that embody several messages and actually serve as a cultural relic during these turbulent times. Perhaps one of the strongest of the included messages is the emphasized call for solidarity among African Americans. Within the hook, which is a series of repeated lyrics throughout the song, the phrase, “Like we all got shot, we all got shot, throwin’ up our hands don 't let them shoot us, cause we all we got, we all we got,” (The Game et al., 2012-2014, lines 7-9) expresses the realizations that all African Americans face within a nation exacerbated by police shootings. With their race being targeted causing an epiphany of racial issues, African Americans have instinctively joined forces to ward off all disparages and voice their desires, epitomizing The Game’s lyrical messages. This is most prominent in Baltimore ever since the riots that ravaged the city have subsided. Post-riot …show more content…
It is evident that The Game and his fellow artists know this concern well since they have emphasized it through use in the hook and, obviously, share the same race as those struggling in Baltimore. Furthermore, the presence of musicians, mainly rappers associated with gangs, in Baltimore is a clear manifestation of thirteen rappers working synonymously with The Game. Professions aside, collective concern is undoubtedly a uniform feeling among the nation’s blacks. The line between both the song and Baltimore are drawn even closer when Diddy pleads, “Yo come on we gotta stick together.” (The Game et al., 2012-2014, line 20). Diddy’s call to the audience indicates that the situation facing African Americans is menacing enough to require unanimity, or simply, the act of “stick[ing] together.” (The Game et al., 2012-2014, line 20). Diddy is anticipating that cooperation will result in a strengthened response. In Baltimore, the situation is no different. Following

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