Analysis Of A Magnificent Catastrophe By Edward J. Larson

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A Magnificent Catastrophe, written by author Edward J. Larson, is focus on the First Presidential Campaign in the 1800s. Prior to 1800, the United States had not presidential election, but electoral politics is re-oriented United States in it is definite direction and solidified the two party system since 1800, so that is reason why this book is worth of notice. He has written about Founding Fathers of America who are Jefferson, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, and Aaron Burr during the critical 1800 election. They have participated in the country’s principal documents, primarily the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution that was influenced by philosophers Hobbes and Locke. Although election could be followed in strict adherence to law and principle and not turn into a …show more content…
He starts his book with Jefferson and Adams story about two parties such as the Republicans and the Federalists. They are big differences about how to govern the United States. Jefferson, who is representative of Republicans, supports freedom of each state and the government should be populist government that trusted popular rule with his running mate New York’s Aaron Burr. However, John Adams and Alexander Hamilton, who they are representative of Federalists, support a strong army and navy, and insist that strong central government that all authority concentrated in the president. The differences dividing Adams and Jefferson reflected two parties have different ideologies. The political disputes would turn founding fathers from friends to enemies. The two factions had developed into true political parties to this day. First of all, when John Adams became second president in United States, Thomas Jefferson became vice president. In 1797 during his time in office, John Adams sent to diplomatic commission to France for negotiate the commercial treaty about protect U.S Navy. After that

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