Analysis Of A Journey By Wharton

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Additionally, Wharton also sheds light towards the idea of a woman obtaining complete independence. For example, Wharton illustrates the impediment that a woman experiences when she is left by herself to take care of her deceased husband. In her story, A Journey, she portrays a young unnamed woman and her ill husband returning to New York after their trip to Colorado. They went to Colorado in order to visit a doctor who could help the ill husband, but the couple found that the husband 's condition could not be helped. As their Journey to New York starts the husbands health becomes worse and on one night the wife found that her husband has died. As a result, she almost screams in terror, but stops due to the thought of being thrown out of …show more content…
This results the wife to be consumed by it to the point that she can 't differentiate between her own thoughts and her voice. At one point "She felt herself beset with difficulties too evasive to be fought by so direct a temperament. She still loved him, of course; but he was gradually, undefinably ceasing to be himself. The man she had married had been strong, active, gently masterful: the male whose pleasure it is to clear a way through the material obstructions of life; but now it was she who was the protector, he who must be shielded from importunities and given his drops or his beef-juice though the skies were falling" (Wharton 38-45). This event highlights Wharton 's views for women to have complete independence is filled with many obstacles. For instance, in this text Wharton illustrates a woman obtaining her autonomy, but is consumed by it. This is for the reason that she was not accustomed to being "the protector", "to clear a way thorough the material obstructions of life" something that her husband did. This led her to cling on to her deceased husband even after she was given her independence through his death. This woman did not hate the aspect of independence as one might think, but more of the …show more content…
In this short story Wharton illustrates a woman in the afterlife reminiscing about the incomplete life she had with her husband. To be more precise Wharton writes about a woman in the afterlife conversing with a spirit called The Spirit of Life. This spirit then asks her if she obtained the fullness of life while she was alive. Subsequently the unnamed woman says no and states that a woman 's nature is filled with many rooms and in these rooms represents a portion of a woman 's personality. Furthermore she reveals that the deepest room lays a lonely woman. Afterwards the woman tells the spirit that her husband never passed the family sitting-room and that "that he was quite content to remain there. He thought it perfectly beautiful, and sometimes, when he was admiring its commonplace furniture, insignificant as the chairs and tables of a hotel parlor, I felt like crying out to him: 'Fool, will you never guess that close at hand are rooms full of treasures and wonders, such as the eye of man hath not seen, rooms that no step has crossed, but that might be yours to live in, could you but find the handle of the door" (Wharton 14-15)? In this excerpt Wharton portrays a woman yearning to be understood by her husband. This is shown as the woman "felt like crying out" to her husband to inform him that they 're many more rooms "close at hand:. Furthermore, she shows that these

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