Freedom In South Africa Research Paper

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From Captivity of Political Shackles to Freedom in South Africa

Throughout history, South Africa has experienced a long, severe, and unrelenting periods of sacrifice and struggle for freedom. South African citizens had to withstand colonization of Great Britain which stripped them of political freedom, roles in national decision making, and also led to the depletion of rich cultures. In addition, South Africa fought extremely hard to achieve decolonization from Great Britain. After decolonizing South Africa, the citizens faced apartheid which led to the Anti-Apartheid Movement to finally gaining full independence. South Africa was tremendously transformed with the help of Nelson Mandela and the Anti- Apartheid movement.
South African Independence and Apartheid System
First and foremost, South Africa gained their independence from Great Britain on May 31, 19101. This was a profound moment of relief for the South African inhabitants who were under the imperialistic control of Great Britain. Despite their newfound independence, South Africa had to face another struggle against white minority rule. After World War II (1945), South Africa was on the brink of negotiating a plan to decolonize and get rid of white rule. South Africa began to give rise to more radical African political movements but was halted by the National Party gaining rule in
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This resistance was expressed through non-violent demonstrations, protests, and strikes. Nelson Mandela (1918- 2013) was hugely involved in helping end the apartheid system in South Africa. He was an activist and the founder of the African National Congress (1940).3 He led many peaceful protests and armed resistance against the National Party tactics in racially dividing South Africa. His commitment to helping black South Africans grew stronger with the election of the National Party (1948). The African National Congress (ANC) under Nelson Mandela had

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