Regretative Qualitative Analysis

Superior Essays
In the interpretative qualitative analysis (IPA), conducted by Gold, et al. and titled, “An Exploration of Music Listening in Chronic Pain,” the purpose was to create improved guidelines to assist in developing music-based self-management strategies for individuals suffering from chronic pain. Semi-structured interviews were implemented for eleven individuals suffering from multi-sited pain for at least two years at a chronic pain clinic. Each interview was digitally recorded; lasting twenty to forty-five minutes and was introduced by briefly summarizing the purpose of the study, followed by an open-ended question about how music was important in their life. Further questions enquired about his or her experience of listening to music before …show more content…
that involved one patient who was recently diagnosed with stage III Hodgkin disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of music therapy in decreasing stress and anxiety, relieving pain and nausea, providing distraction, alleviating depression, and promoting the expression of feelings. The method of study involved one group therapy session and three individual sessions with the music therapist. Before the music therapy sessions began, the music therapist assessed the patient in order to identify her specific needs. This included assessment of the patient’s preference in music, including genre, style, musical skills, and if she wanted to take an active or passive part in the music therapy sessions. Her actual levels of anxiety and stress were also assessed. Upon assessment of these parameters, the music therapist learned that the patient enjoyed soft rock and jazz, instrumental and vocal music, and was open to both active and passive music therapy. Once the assessment data had been collected and reviewed, the music therapy plan was ready to be implemented. The patient attended one group therapy session called a “chime circle,” which involved a group of patients, all undergoing chemotherapy, and they played music with the chimes with the direction of the music therapist. The individual session involved the music therapist …show more content…
conducted a study titled “The Impact of Music Therapy Versus Music Medicine on Psychological Outcomes and Pain in Cancer Patients.” This was a mixed-methods study, in which we focused on the qualitative data to answer our research questions. The sample size included thirty-one adult cancer patients that took part in two different sessions of music-based interventions. One session involved the patients performing active music, such as singing, playing simple percussion instruments, and playing along with the music therapist. Another session of music-based intervention included the patient listing off their music preferences and then allowing the therapist to make a playlist for the patient to listen to. During this specific session, the therapist was not allowed to be in the same room, and the participant was only advised to sit and listen to the playlist. After the sessions were over, the participants took part in a semi-structured interview that was recorded and later transcribed for accuracy. The researchers’ results concluded that music is indeed helpful to alleviate the symptoms of the patients, both physically and psychologically. The research team further reported that the degree of treatment benefits was dependent on the patients’ ability and willingness to be a part of the group and participate in the music

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