An Example Of Extrajudicial Violence In The Rwandan Genocide

Better Essays
History is littered with examples of what happens when there is little to no legal system set up, or when the system is weak. In attempts to keep the peace, government forces act well beyond their mandate, and take the law into their own hands. They execute anyone suspected of illegal activity without due process, even if the accused has done nothing wrong. It is a barbaric practice that belongs in the past, and yet it continues to this day. There is no clearer example than the Philippines and President Duterte’s War on Drugs. Squeezing into office by the skin of his teeth, he vowed to clean up the country and fix the drug problem. What has followed is a brutal campaign that has left over 3,000 dead in the first hundred days of his term (Amnesty …show more content…
The Rwandan Genocide was an example of extrajudicial killing on a mass scale. Violence has long been used as a solution to problems within the Philippines, going back to colonial times. After Ferdinand Marcos declared martial law, the killings in the Philippines increased. With the country descending into lawless chaos, both the rebels and government forces resorted to barbaric tactics, with the NPA “known to have used death squads known as ‘Sparrow Units’ in the mid-80s to purge its ranks of government spies and to steal armaments” (Perreño 2011). When Marcos was ousted as president, the killings and the violence across the country slowed. Piece was made with some of the rebel groups that occupy the southern part of the country. However, there has been a recent upswing in the number of killings since the early 2000s. In 2006, Reporters Without Borders ranked the Philippines 142nd on the World Press Freedom Index, citing “continuing murders of journalists and increased legal harassment” (RSF 2006). In the efforts to crack down and terminate the rebel and communist groups once and for all, the Filipino armed forces began to suppress not just their adversaries, but also the press. As rebels became harder to draw into open conflict, the nature of the engagement changed, and there was a return to the methods the existed under Marcos. “Agreement is widespread that most killings can be attributed to the government in general, and to the AFP in particular. Instead of an unrelated series of murders carried out by criminals, the killings ‘constitute a pattern of politically targeted extrajudicial executions’…” (Holden 2012). A comprehensive study of extrajudicial killings carried out between 2001 and 2010 found that “most of the suspects are still identified (57% of 837) …19% of those identified are members of the Armed Forces of the Philippines…”, and

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    In 1930, Rafael Leonidas Trujillo Molina gained control of the Dominican Republic through questionable means, becoming head of police and then president, his regime was well recognized for its oppressive tactics and effective means of keeping the population controlled, by the time he was deposed and assassinated in 1961, he had been responsible for the deaths of as many as 50,000 Dominicans (U.S DoS), meaning that 1 in 66 was executed. As his time as president continued, more opposition grew, and eventually he lost the majority favor. Local citizens rose up and rebelled. An apprehensive church first remained neutral in the event, even favoring Trujillo, but as his monstrosities came to light, it became more and more difficult to remain passive,…

    • 1212 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    faced with RPF success on the battlefield and at the negotiating table, these few power holders changed the strategy of ethnic division into genocide. They believed that the extermination campaign would reinstate the credibility of the Hutu under their leadership and help them win the war, or at least improve their chances of negotiating a favorable peace. They took control of the state and used its authority to carry out the massacre. in about three weeks after april 6 1994, 800,000 men and women were killed, which could be as many as three quarters of the Tutsi population. Thousand of the Hutu were killed as well due to the opposition of the rebellious Tutsi and the people directing it.…

    • 1641 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As they continue on to achieve their goal of turning the government in Columbia they terrorism is well known that delivers bloodshed to the country of Columbia every time they rage against the government. The pursuance of the government is steady unlike that the domestic terrorism in the United States that is a one time attack in reflection of Mcveigh’s negative views of the government. Abu Sayyaf on the other hand expresses their negative views of the Philippines…

    • 958 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    William Sobolewski Period 4 Persuasive Essay: The War on Drugs Over 40 years ago, US President Richard Nixon declared drug abuse to be the public enemy, which started an unprecedented international crusade known as, the War on Drugs. Today, we know The War on Drugs is a huge failure. It led to mass incarceration in the US; corruption, political destabilization, violence in Latin America, Asia, and Africa, as well as, systemic human rights abuses across the world. It has negatively affected the lives of millions of people. All of this while we waste billions of dollars every year only to create and fuel powerful drug cartels while, the goal of a world without drugs seems less achievable than ever.…

    • 989 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    I believe instead that this specific incident is an example of politicide, because the government did most of the killing and it was mostly because of a war. While these were still of course outrageous war crimes, they were committed by both sides and the Tigers killed their fair share of Sinhalese civilians too. It was no surprise that the Sri Lankan government fought back in a similar way and crushed the rebellion after over 26 years of fighting. Of course, the fighting all started because of the oppression of the Tamils and they had few choices, but they committed similar crimes during the war that the Sri Lankan government did. This is of course overshadowed by the fact that Sri Lanka is a government and should have the good of its people in mind and make sure that its inhabitants are safe.…

    • 1809 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As larger cartels began to fall, the smaller ones begin to become more violent. They are all fighting for the route through Chilapa, and will do whatever it takes to gain that precious passage. Due to the fact that smaller cartels do not have control over production, distribution, and sale of drugs on an international scale, they look to kidnapping, car theft, and human trafficking to boost their income. Violence is their key to success. [Neuman] In August 2010, Los Zetas executed 78 immigrants in San Fernando, and just months later Mexican authorities found 47 mass graves with at least 193 unidentified bodies, causalities all due to the drug war.…

    • 1285 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The facts showed the violence, “between 1975-1979, an estimated 1.5-2 million people or ¼ of the country’s population died due to starvation, disease, forced labor, torture and genocide”(Cambodia Quick) and “the Khmer rouges killed the alleged political foes: the leaders of the preceding regime and the army officers (82,6%), the policemen (66,7%) and above all the judges, 99% of whom were killed”(Pran). Cambodian genocide killed a lot of people, reversed class order, and destroyed the economic system, and it was one event which worth studying for the ages, not for what it accomplished, but for what it…

    • 1312 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Rwanda Conflict

    • 1022 Words
    • 5 Pages

    One of the main mysteries of the Rwandan Genocide is who shot the plane. Many believe that the current president, Paul Kagame, was the culprit, despite there being little evidence to back the claim up (BBC News). Once the news of Habyarimana’s assassination had reached the ears of the people, the Presidential Guard along with other groups, including multiple Hutu militia groups, began the murder of the Tutsis as well as moderate Hutus. The frustration over unequal treatment over the years had finally reached its breaking point and was being lashed out on those who caused the…

    • 1022 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Secondly, with more addicts being able to find help, the number of overdose related deaths would also decrease. Lastly, decriminalization would cease all unnecessary drug related arrests. Law enforcement would be able to focus on going after drug suppliers, rather than users. As a result of the 1994 crime bills, many people were arrested for non-violent drug related crimes. The nation can learn from that experience, every time someone was caught with possession, we added to the incarceration rates, which overcrowded our jails, costing our government millions of dollars.…

    • 1023 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The killing fields of Cambodia “(1975-1979)” (Krkljes, 2015) are where Pol Pot and his authoritarian government committed a mass murder. The Khmer Rouge knew that knowledge is power, which is why they mainly focused on “exterminating” the “educated.” There were nearly “2 million Cambodians” murdered on these killing fields. (Center) Cambodia today is still working to fully recover from the loss of those millions of lives. They are in the midst of an enduring…

    • 1228 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays