Twin Study In School

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An example of a disorganized environment would be a chaotic home for a child. A lot of people would agree with the opinion that children growing up in these disorderly homes tend to not do well in school. As said by Kovas and Haworth, (2007), scholastic achievement to some degree is passed down genetically. The twin study done by Hanscombe, Haworth, Davis, Jaffee, and Plomin (2011) was to examine the genetic and environmental factors that link disorderly and chaotic homes and how well a child does in school. Identical twins share one hundred percent of their DNA, while non-identical twins only share fifty percent of their DNA. Hanscombe, Haworth, Davis, Jaffee, and Plomin (2010) have done research that studied both identical and non-identical …show more content…
As previously stated, identical twins share 100% their DNA, while non-identical twins share only 50% of their DNA. To be able achieve accurate results, the researchers used a twin study to compare the differences between identical and non-identical twins’ and their viewpoints of their homes. This study conducted by Hanscombe et al., (2011) examined the children’s observations of chaos in their homes at both ages 9 and 12. The teachers also assessed academic achievement only at age 12. At both ages 9 and 12, data was obtained using a smaller form of the CHAOS scale (Confusion, Hubbub and Order Scale). The CHAOS scale was sent to each twin in the mail and it examined the degree of racket, routine, and household mayhem. At age 12, researchers obtained data on academic success for about 3,040 twin pairs by reviewing in-class student assessments. They used the NC (UK National Curriculum) criteria. This measure provided specific assessment guidelines for all the teachers in the UK education system. Using a scale from 1 to 8 with an added level 9 for extraordinary academic success, they assessed the students in English, mathematics, and science. After obtaining all the required data, the researchers then compared the academic results of both the monozygotic and dizygotic twins in hopes of attaining the genetic and …show more content…
In other words, they state that children significantly influence their own intellectual development with both genetic and environmental factors working together. McGue, Bouchard, Iacono, and Lykken (1993) performed family studies of IQ that were done with over a 100 twin pairs. Like the chaotic-achievement study, the results of these studies supported that genetics as well as the environment are important influences of related IQ scores. Their major finding was about identical twins who share 100% of their genes having more comparable IQ scores than non-identical twins who share only 50% of their genes. However, because the identical twins’ IQ scores are not exactly the same, this shows that there are also sociological aspects that contribute to one’s IQ. To analyze the sociological/environmental impact, the researchers assessed the difference in scores between identical twins that were raised together verses those reared apart. As a result, they found that monozygotic twins raised together had more similar IQs than those raised separately. This supports that environment also plays a role in intellectual development. In conclusion, one can see how genetic and environmental pathways contribute greatly to children’s intellectual development, as described in both the study discussed in the textbook by Siegler et al., 2014 and the study done by Hanscombe et al.,

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