An Elements Of Realism In Great Expectations By Charles Dickens

Great Essays
First of all I concentrate on formal element of Great Expectation, putting a question: how far does Dickens want us to be conscious that a novel is what we are reading? It can be answered in a way is, it depends on the specific episode. Dickens’s novel brings the conventions of nineteenth century in ‘realism’ through a fiction that is nevertheless sufficient like the real worlds to convince us that it is. To forget that realism is a particular fictional technique to ignore the pre-eminent role of language in novel.1 A ‘character’ in a novel is, in the end, a group of sentence and paragraphs of description, physical and psychological, which are first attached to a particular proper name, so that when that name recurs we are able to understand …show more content…
We are accustomed to accepting novels to present us with satisfactory conclusion, by which we usually means a solution to the problem and predicaments the story has set out. But isn’t this altogether unrealistic? How many of problems and predicaments of real life – moral, social, political – are solved and brought to harmonious conclusion? The novelist resolution brought at the end of a novel are, in effect, solely verbal. Thefact that we expect and take pleasure in theme doesn’t in the least make them ‘real’, if we mean by that, having a direct correspondence with event in the world. Let us look partly issue of ‘realism’ and more closely issue of the language of Great Expectation. We can engage the realism issue at one level by considering a prominent aspect of two plots of the novel, in the second part of the novel (chapter 20-39) how does Dickens keep alive the chapter dominated by ‘Havisham-plot’ in the shape of Pip’s conviction that she is his benefactor, and by her encouragement of his hopeless love for Estella. Chapter 28’ 29 and 30 is most preferable choice for relevant …show more content…
Attention to imagery in novels was encourage by the study of poetry, especially of Imagist poetry of the early twentieth-century written on the principle that poets communicated less through ideas, arguments, or abstraction, than through clear visual images. We’ve already there are examples of imagery in Great Expectations less immediately striking, yet collectively as significant, primarily because the same or similar images unexpectedly recur in different contexts. For example, when Pip have seen Magwitch hunted down and captured by the soldiers, he is taken back to the Hulks by a crew of other

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