An Analysis of the Illusion and the Truth with the Depression of Human Beingthrough on Psychoanalysis Theory on“Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” by Edward Albee

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An Analysis of the Illusion and the Truth WITH THE DEPRESSION
OF Human BEINGthrough on Psychoanalysis theory
On“WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?” by edward albee Chapter I
INTRODUCTION

1. A. Background of the Study
Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? was a play work by Edward Albee. It was produced in New York in 1962. Actually, this era is the transition of modernism into postmodernism that using the absurdist paradigm in order to break the rules of modernism and found a new era. The theme of the story tells about human condition at that era with combined by Albee with theory of absurd. It was taken as a symbol to the 1960s American society.
Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? was written during a period in American culture
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Dreams for Freud are essentiallysymbolic fulfilments of unconscious wishes; and they are cast in symbolicform because if this material were expressed directly then it might beshocking and disturbing enough to wake us up.”
In this theory has the relationship with the three aspect of Id (or unconscious desire),Ego(an inividual identity), and Super ego (consists of two parts, the conscience and the ego-ideal) Chapter II
An Analysis of the Illusion and the Truth WITH THE DEPRESSION
OF Human BEINGthrough on Psychoanalysis theory
On “WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?” by edward albee

1. A. Biographical of the author
Edward Albee is supposed to be one of the greatest absurdist playwrights after the Second World War in American literature. Edward Albee was born in Washington, DC on March 12, 1928. When he was two weeks old, baby Edward was adopted by millionaire couple Reed and Frances Albee.Young Edward was raised by his adoptive parents in Westchester, New York. Because of his father’s and grandfather’s involvement in the theatre business, Edward was exposed to theatre and well-known Vaudeville personalities throughout his childhood.
From early on, Edward’s mother Frances tried to groom her son to be a respectable member of New York society. In 1940, twelve-year-old Edward entered the Lawrenceville School. Then, Edward attended Choate from 1944 to 1946. Even as a teenager, Edward was a prolific writer. In 1945, his poem “Eighteen” was

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