An Analysis Of 'Rosie The Riveter'

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Feminists are ambitious beings that believe in the social, political, and economic equality of the sexes. Gloria Steinem, an American feminist, once stated "Feminism has never been about getting a job for one woman. It 's about making life more fair for women everywhere. It 's not about a piece of the existing pie; there are too many of us for that. It 's about baking a new pie. " Comparing feminism to "baking a new pie" suggests that women seek a drastic change in today 's society. Despite America 's perseverance in World War II, encouragement and motivation were essential in getting America back on its feet (although, Pearl Harbor did help with that ). During the war, "Rosie the Riveter" plays an enormous role in the spark of feminism. "Rosie" …show more content…
Written by Redd Evans and John Jacob Loeb in 1942, the song "Rosie the Riveter " was released before any other form of advertisement. Published in early 1943, the track was often played on the radio and broadcasted nationally. The lyrics state that a stereotypical woman would be caught sipping on martinis, while a girl named Rosie put these women to shame. Evans and Loeb wrote that Rosie works hard as a riveter and that she 's "Making history." Because this song became quite popular, many women sought to be real life "Rosie 's" and aspired to make history as well. The song portrays the notion that women are capable of working hard and taking over manly jobs in the …show more content…
Rockwell 's piece of propaganda appeared on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post on May 29, 1943. The Saturday Evening Post used to be one of America 's most popular magazines – selling at least three million copies a week. Everyone knew about this magazine; it was a great way to publicize Norman 's image. Many people debate that the "Rosie the Riveter" song inspired Rockwell 's illustration, especially because the name "Rosie" is embellished on the lunch box in his painting . The image depicts a muscular woman war worker who is likely on her lunch break. Her rivet gun casually rests on her lap along with her lunchbox. Her attire is a denim unisex uniform, which implies that her job is capable by both men and women. Her foot rests smack on the cover of Adolf Hitler 's book Mein Kampf. The American flag background further entails Rosie 's patriotic duty in the

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