An Analysis Of René Descartes's The Mediations Of God

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René Descartes was a modern philosopher and was dualist. He wrote The Mediations of First Philosophy in 1641. In his arguments he expresses his believes of two substances, which are Res Cogitans and Res Extensa. He will also, give you arguments about how he concluded that god existed, and will use god in his argument to show how it is possible for corporeal things to exist, as well as introduce you the mind and body problem. Descartes will at one-point doubt everything, even his existence, which means he is willing to use hyperbolic thought. He does this because he is going after the indubitable truth. He puts his hyperbolic thought in action when he introduces the Dream Hypothesis and The Evil Demon Hypothesis in order to prove that the senses …show more content…
The “piece of wax” argument explains how his mind works and lets him know that corporeal substance (Res Extensa) is not primarily known by means of sense experience. First Descartes tries to examine the piece of wax by the means of senses. He first took into account the smell, taste, shape, color, size and hardness of the wax. He starts thinking of how the piece of wax will change if it is exposed to other things, like exposing it to fire. He knows it will melt, therefore figuring out that qualities change but the piece of wax is still wax. He knows that he can only understand the piece of wax by intellect alone. Descartes introduces this argument to prove that the mind is better at knowing than the body, therefore it confirms his existence and the nature of his mind, and helps him understand his mind more. With this conclusion, he finds himself stuck in Solipsism, which means that he believes that the whole universe is against his mind. In order to solve this problem and save his existence, he starts to examine the idea of God, in mediation three (René Descartes, …show more content…
He believes God lacks nothing, that he is omniscient, omnipotent, morally perfect, immutable, creator, etc. This is what let him know that could not have created the idea of God, because he is imperfect, and something imperfect cannot come up with something perfect. Then concludes that the idea of God is not adventitious or factitious. Once this is concluded, Descartes starts using the idea of The clear and Distinct idea as his criterion of truth, because for him God guarantees the truth of every “clear and distinct” idea or conception that he can conceive (René Descartes,

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