Theodicy In John Milton's Paradise Lost

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Milton
(An Analysis of Milton’s Theodicy in Paradise Lost) Studies of religion have been made since the dawn of all religions of the world. Humanity will always seek to explain the unexplainable, and religion is possibly the most comforting explanation. As more religions came to rise, and more branches split from one another, scholars of history sought to understand and catalogue the religions of the world. No exception to this is the great writer, John Milton. In 1667, Milton wrote the English epic, Paradise Lost, which put a whole new interpretation of the Christian Adam and Eve story. This text brought new ideas and his own interpretation of Christ and God to the forefront of literature in his time. Through Paradise Lost, Milton explored
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As a father figure to the fallen angels, God is by no means happy with them, yet is more taken aback at their rebellion to his benevolent creation of their perfect world. Dennis Daniel questions what could have taken place in this rhetorical scenario, “One can wonder what would have happened to the fallen angels, had they chosen the course of action suggested by Belial to one day return to God’s graces. Would God let them back?” (Daniel). Truthfully, Milton almost makes God appear insulted and genuinely surprised by the initial rebellion. At one point in Paradise Lost, he takes time to question himself as to what more the fallen angels could have wanted. However, when it comes to humanity, Milton’s God truly plays the role of disappointed father that hopes to one day see his children redeem themselves. God was very clear to give mankind the free will to choose whether or not to bring the fall upon themselves. Despite their choice, Adam and Eve are given the promise of redemption in the far future. “Upheld by me, yet once more he shall stand on even ground against his mortal foe,” (178-180). God is truly a father figure hoping to see his children succeed later after learning from their mistakes. David Parry states, “Man can always redeem himself,” (Parry). Milton reinforces this idea through his interpretation of the

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