An Analysis Of Colorblind By Alex Kotlowitz

721 Words 3 Pages
Colorblind For years, African Americans have gathered to create a colorless society. Historical groups have tried to gain racial equality through riots, marches and often sacrificing their own lives. New generations have forgotten the true meaning of what it is to be colorblind. Alex Kotlowitz an award winning author on urban affairs appeared on New York Times for his article “Colorblind,” in which he addresses an issue that society is said to be colorblind, even though people still chose to believe their own myths which leads to division of race. Through the use of statistics, emotional appeal, and credible experiences of the towns, he persuades the reader that people are still living in a world full of racism and discrimination that is kept …show more content…
He shares how he spent time on both sides of the bridge with two African American kids. He compares his experience with both of them one each side of the bridge. He shares how at Benton Harbor a black man saw two black boys in danger and in St. Joseph a police officer and white women saw a white man who was Kotlowitz in danger. The reader can create an assumption through this example that social division does still exist and people chose sides according to their race. To make his point stronger Kotlowitz explains that the boys are not yet at the height of his shoulder, which can stir empathy toward the reader and implies the idea that Kotlowitz is at less chance of being harmed by the two young boys if they were in …show more content…
Kotlowitz interviews a white man about Eric’s death who was an African American kid dating a white girl and was reported death a little after crossing over to St. Joseph. The white man responded, “ That nigger came on the wrong side of the bridge.” Kotlowitz’s point is established that there is still social disparity and negativity between the two towns. The author interviewed an African American woman who experienced racial discrimination. Kotlowitz explained that she did not whine nor complain but only shares her story. It is clear that these groups of people who are being discriminated against are not driven by anger to speak up about the racial problem that forms part of their daily life. The author shares the two myths created by each town over Eric. The people of St. Joseph believed that Eric drowned while swimming across the river trying to escape from the police. The people from Benton Harbor believed that white people from St. Joseph killed Eric. Through the two contrasting beliefs the author gains strength to his argument allowing the social class issue to be more believable for the audience along with an assumption that both towns thought negative of each

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