Ain T Scared Of Your Jail Analysis

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In the segment of Eyes on the Prize that we watched in class, the story was taken place during the civil rights era. The overall look of Eyes on the Prize is the recounting of the fights by men and women to end the long years of segregation and discrimination. It was during the time where whites and blacks could not go to the same school, ride the same bus, vote in the same election, or in general, participate equally in society. African American were second class in America. In this particular segment, it showed how people were participating and forming peaceful demonstrations to fight against segregation and discrimination, but they received resistance and brutality from society (police and peers). The segment of Ain’t Scared of Your Jail …show more content…
Therefore, if an economic activity has the possibility of substantially affecting interstate commerce, then the Affectation Doctrine grants Congress the power to regulate that activity. The Affectation Doctrine apply to restaurants and business refusing to serve people of color and it is also applied to the segregation in interstate bus terminals. As it is stated in the Constitution, based on the Commerce Clause, the Congress has power to regulate interstate commerce. With the Affectation Doctrine, it takes local activity and changes it into interstate activity, thus making it regulated by Congress. This is because if the intrastate activity affects people in another state, then the intrastate activity becomes interstate activity. Using the Heart of Atlanta, Katzenbach and Wickard cases, I can better explain how the Affectation Doctrine could apply to the segment of the …show more content…
This motel solicits patronage from outside of State of Georgia through various national advertising media, including magazines of national circulation, billboards, and highway signs. Also, many of their guests are from out of town. In this particular case, the motel’s owner refused to rent rooms to guests who were African American. Under the Civil Rights Act of 1964, it says that “all persons shall be entitled to the full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of any place of public accommodation, as defined in this section (201 (a)), without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, or national origin.” Furthermore, listed in 201 (b), any business establishments that “serves the public” and “is a place of public accommodation” such as any inn, hotel, motel, or other establishments which provide accommodation to transient guests and if its operation affects commerce then the Congress has power to regulate it. Therefore, if we were to look at the segment from the film, the Affectation Doctrine could apply to restaurants and retails if those restaurants are an area that serves transient customers/guests. Also, if those restaurants advertise nationwide and out of state, this will then gives power to Congress to regulate

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