Eslanda Robeson: The Black Freedom Movement

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Women, like men, have always been a part of historical events but they aren’t given as much attention or significance. The main reason was a lack of respect from their counterparts. Women weren’t granted equal rights or an equal voice and were continually obstructed by men. However, this did not stop women altogether. Women such as Eslanda Robeson, Shirley Graham Du Bois and Amy Jacques Garvey were key figures during the black freedom movement. These women were involved in the social and political rebuilding of African American society and identity. Women were an integral part of the black freedom struggle and their efforts were impactful. African American leaders established political connections with global movements to strengthen their …show more content…
During her time at the London School of Economics, she witnessed firsthand, how eurocentrism got in the way of objective science. Her fellow students also remarked how Robeson had more in common with them than the “Other” because she was educated. Eslanda Robeson asserted that she wasn 't European, she was what they called “primitive” and the “Other. Robeson declared that black people like her can and are educated. Eslanda Robeson was inspired to study about her heritage. Eslanda Robeson travelled to Africa to learn more about African culture and people. When she made the trip to Africa, she felt a sense of belonging. Robeson easily connected with the people she met in Africa. Mahon discusses the impact of Eslanda Robeson’s “African Journey.” Robeson was determined to dispel the notion that Africans were savages and had to be “cultured.” Through anecdotes and photographs, Robeson “humanized” African people. Africans were like everyone else, living like everyone else. Robeson realized that there is a lot to learn from Africa. She argued that Africans were far more efficient and not as superficial as Europeans. Furthermore, Robeson was confident that Africans can do well on their own and don’t need to be cultured. She understood that her connection to her husband allowed her to be treated much better than everyone else. However, she took full advantage capturing and …show more content…
While we can do more to record their stories, it isn’t the only issue to be addressed. What’s most important is understanding the impact of their work and actions. Although women were not given an equal platform they were just as powerful. Women like Eslanda Robeson, Amy Jacques Garvey and Shirley Graham Du Bois greatly contributed to the black freedom struggle and provided a new platform for future women to pursue. These women wanted equal rights for black people but they would soon become an inspiration for women’s rights activists as well. Robeson, Garvey and Du Bois are pioneers for women in the sociopolitical sphere. There is no reason why these women shouldn’t be etched in history alongside their

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