Amitava Kumar's Article: An Analysis Of Restorative Justice

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Restorative justice is a very uncommon practice in the court room. In this process everyone who is directly affected in this crime can all optionally participate. The reasoning behind this is because restorative justice concerns the perpetrator essentially making amends with the victim and their family. The first step in making amends is for the suspect of the crime to take full responsibility for his actions and the people he has harmed. Restorative justice’s main goal is to rectify the harm caused by the crime. In the article published in 2013 in Caravan magazine, “The Restoration of Faith”, Amitava Kumar informed the reader of a case where restorative justice was practiced. Kumar grew up in India but is now a professor at Vassar College, …show more content…
He included in great detail how Connor described killing his girlfriend, Ann. “Ann was on her knees, her hand raised to stop him, when he fired” (74). This quote paints the picture in your head of what occurred that night. It really shows that Ann wanted to live by putting her hand up to stop him. Kumar uses the strategy of painting the picture in your head of what had happened, as one of his strengths in his emotional appeal. Kumar uses a very descriptive tone to appeal to the audience’s emotions. The tone throughout the article changes from being mad at Conor to feeling sorry for him. He does this by describing the parent’s reactions to hearing how he killed Ann, which was very painful for them. Even after all that, Ann’s parents didn’t want Conor to spend life in prison. “The Grosmaires said that they didn’t forgive Conor for his sake, but their own” (74). Ann’s mother also expressed how “Forgiveness for me was self-preservation” (74). Kumar included these quotes to really make his emotional appeal as impactful as it can be. By doing so, he demonstrated how forgiving the Grosmaires were considering the given …show more content…
There was only one logical argument made by Kumar and it only occupied one paragraph. In this he describes a step-by-step process of how restorative justice works in the court room. He provides the definition of restorative justice from Conor’s attorney, Baliga, “community-based processes that hold people who harm directly accountable to the people that they’ve harmed” (73). When defending this case the court doesn’t ask traditional questions like “What law was broken? Who broke it? How should we punish them?” they instead ask “What harm has been done? What needs have arisen? Whose obligation is it to meet those needs?” (73). The Grosmaires and the McBrides both demonstrated that in their actions with the common objective to honor the memory of Ann Grosmaire. Kumar’s logical appeal here was mainly directed at explaining the process of restorative justice and what it all consists of. Kumar’s organization of this paragraph also contributed to his weak logical argument. It would benefit Kumar greatly if he went more in depth on this topic or provided other logical arguments. His points seemed to be all over the place which affected his argument

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