Amistad vs. the Interesting Narrative Life of Olaudah Equiano

615 Words Nov 13th, 2004 3 Pages
CoMpArE and CoNtRaSt

Both, "The Interesting Narrative Life of Olaudah Equiano" and "Amistad" are important stories about slavery in pre-civil war america because they both address the issues of slavery. These gentlemen in the story made a difference in the slave trade. In "The life of Olaudah Equiano", Olaudah was sold on a slave ship that came to the Barbados. Olaudah worked for his freedom, and in the end became efficient in American language. He worked his way to the free life and in the end it worked out for him, although it leaves scars on his soul. In "Amistad", Cinque is a slave that leads a revolt on a slave ship after escaping. When they get to america, Baldwin, a lawyer that is representing the slave and the former
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"The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano" focuses more on the harsh conditions on the slave ships while the "Amistad" story spends more time on the trial that set the slave free. Olaudah Equiano fought against slavery in England while Cinque and the Africans of the Amistad became a symbol of freedom for the abolitionist movement in Pre-Civil War America. In conclusion, both "The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano" and "Amistad" are important stories that thoughtfully comment on the slavery issue. "The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano" points out the harsh conditions on the slave ships. The story of "Amistad", African slaves and the trials they had to go through highlights the injustice of slavery. As Adams said "The natural state of mankind is instead-and I know this is a controversial idea-is freedom…is freedom. And the proof is the length to which a man, woman or child will go to regain it once taken. He will break loose his chains. He will decimate his enemies. He will try and try and try, against all odds, against all prejudices, to get home." Thus, both stories have a similar theme in that they both show the hardships of slavery. "o, ye nominal Christians! Might not an African ask you, Learned you from this God who says unto you, Do unto all men as you would men should do unto

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