American Revolutionary War Analysis

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“The British armed forces in the American revolutionary war” by David Syrett, touches a broad range of topics. It talks about how we are still finding historical objects and evidence from that era, such as the following. It explains that the study of the American Revolutionary War did not begin until the last decades of the nineteenth century. Laughton had a great impact on the history of the British military during the American Revolutionary war. In the Age of the Cold War, historians increasingly turned to administrative history to explain the British effort during the American Revolutionary War. “The American Revolution, Wife Beating, and the Emergent Value of Privacy” by Ruth Bloch, examines the legal treatment of wife beating between the colonial period and the mid-nineteenth century. It points out the American Revolution’s DUAL commitment to private rights and to …show more content…
Historians turned to administrative history to explain the British effort during the American Revolutionary War. The French and Indian War gave us somewhat of an example on the account of the tremendous debt the England was in after that war. This turn was in effect because the administrative records of the British government, “and especially those of the Royal Navy” (Syrett), are extensive and mostly complete. “Central to understanding the administrative machine behind the British war effort in the American War are the works of John Brewer, The Sinews of Power: War, Money, and the English State, 1688-1783 (New York: Knopf, 1989), and J. E. D. Binney, British Public Finance and Administration, 1774-92 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1958)” (Syrett). These two studies explain a substantial aspect of the war: “how the British government obtained the huge amounts of money required to pay for it” (Syrett). Which is interesting, because the same question was asked for the French and Indian

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