American Revolution Dbq

Improved Essays
History 135
Professor Brazy
December 2, 2014

Question #1

On “September 3, 1783” , the Treaty of Paris was signed. The Treaty of Paris ended the American Revolution, and gave the 13 colonies their independence from Great Britain. The citizens of the 13 colonies started the revolution that lead to the treaty in order to break away from Britain for many reasons; Republican Motherhood, Declaration of Independence, and religion being some of the main reasons. Considering the ideals that lead up to the American Revolution, in my opinion, the New America lived up to those previously highlighted ideals that the colonist expressed in their rhetoric, as seen in the treatment of women, taxation and the Bill of Rights. On July 4, the Declaration of Independence was signed. The documents announce and
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Women had their decision made by men; whether their father or husband. They worked, but inside the house. The women did the cooking, cleaning and taking care of the children. The law didn’t acknowledge wives’ independence in neither economic nor political matters. That was during the Pre-Revolution. During the American Revolution, the women were taking charge during the absence of the men. No men were around to tell the women what to do. The women had to take control of the men jobs while they were away. Their jobs were in the hands of the women. After the Revolution, it was not uncommon for women to work. They were painters, teachers, innkeepers etc. Many male citizens were willing to accept progresses in female education. Women gained more domestic powers during this time than anything. Also, supply and demand played a part in it as well. The women did fundraisers to help during the war. The Revolution had such an impact on the image of women that they help win the war and helped shape New America. One can see that the rhetoric of freedom and equality became a reality after the

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