American Revolution A Revolution Essay

1301 Words 5 Pages
Throughout history there has always been conflict. Governments are created and over thrown in an endless cycle pushed by citizens unhappy with the system. These conflicts are bloody ordeals with thousands giving their lives for the cause. When their cause is successful, there is a shift in tradition and political control. Through blood and sweat they are able to make a difference, but it doesn’t always have to be that difficult for a revolution. Many historians believe that the American Revolution cannot be classified as a revolution. A revolution is defined a forcible overthrow of a government in favor of a new system while also acquiring new social habits. Through the transference from a monarch society to a democracy and transformation to …show more content…
constitution established the colonies national government after the American Revolution. The colonies created a strong national government and state power ensured to protect the rights of the citizens. The federal government is broken into three branches: executive, legislative, and judicial that balances one another. This form of government was different than Britain, which was not as equally balanced. Britain government not only lacked equilibrium, it also did not allow the vote of the people to choose those in charge. The colonists fought against Britain in the revolution so the people would be able to elect members that best represented their interests. This modification was a drastic one from Britain’s government. With the addition of the Bill of Rights, that advocated freedom of speech and religion was also a major deviation from …show more content…
Even though the American Revolution was not the bloodiest revolution compared to others, lives were still lost for a cause. The colonists believed that they could bring about the change they were fighting for. Many believed in the cause and showed their support in several of ways. Even though most colonists still respected British rule, they were ready to become their own nation with their own government and religion. The colonists were frustrated with having their rights over looked and not being able to be involved in their government that affected their lives so much. They wanted to move away from the corrupted British government into a more open and balanced one. The colonists established their own government that granted people the right to elect their own representative, a system completely different compared to the British government. A monarch ruled Britain and the citizens had very little say in politics. With this revolution, the colonies also created the freedom of religion. Britain was heavily influenced by the presence of the Church of England. Citizens were forced to show their support to the established religion of the nation by paying a tax to the church, despite what they believed in. The colonies viewed this structure as one that was corrupted and moved to alternate their new nation. Colonists believed that people are granted rights that the government cannot be able to control and one of those rights is the freedom of

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