What Is The Path To The American Revolution

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The path to independence for American Rebels would not be an easy one. From the view of militaries, many historians rank the British army as one of the best in the world. How could a motley crew of misfit, part time American soldiers take down this enemy? Three ideas can help understand how America could stand up against the British regulars and win their freedom. One such idea would be French help. Without their assistance, this war probably would have ended earlier and nothing would have been accomplished. Also, winning key battles helped the militia win the war and shock the world. Finally, British experience during the war would eventually force Britain to surrender and bring success to America. Even though this does not cover everything, …show more content…
From Lexington and Concord up until Saratoga, the Americans had to fight the British on their own. By 1776, according to Ferling, France began to take interest in the war and began to secretly help the Rebels fight the British. Why would the French do this? Perhaps to seek revenge for the loss of the French and Indian War would be a reason why they helped. Regardless, this decision, in return, would help the American army to continue to fight for their cause. In a letter from George Washington to John Hancock, Washington had mentioned that he had taken items that he and his troops felt would be beneficial to them to continue to fight. From Bullets to keep the enemy at bay, and blankets to help keep his men warm with the changing of the season, Washington was desperate to remain in this revolution. Supplies were very important to this general, but they do not do them any good if he had no men to fight. Washington expands in his letter that many of his men were ill and could not fight. Manpower is important in combat. With a lack of people, it was only time before he would have to surrender. It would take more to win, and help was needed from allies to win this war. In the Treaty of Alliance with France, art. 11 …show more content…
They would be facing off against one of the best trained militaries of the world. Just because the British Regulars were a harden, experienced group, did not mean that that they were not beatable. To win this war, battles had to be won; American victories and close victories gave them the hope that they could win this war. Bunker Hill, technically not a victory for freedom, was a starting point. According to Ferling, Bunker Hill was a very bloody battle that the British eventually won, it proved to the Rebels that they were capable of going toe to toe with the dominate force. It “Instilled the colonists with confidence.” Sureness changed the attitude of the Americans and made it possible for them to compete in this war. Even though America would continue to lose battles, Trenton-Princeton added victories to the American side. Mentioned by Ferling, these battles, “Restored American Morale.” This morale allowed the underdog to continue to fight. In fact, Ferling explained the battle got the attention of France, and that they would help and eventually enter the war. Following Saratoga, it was almost inevitable that America would

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