Anti Immigrant Sentiment Analysis

Improved Essays
In his farewell address to the nation, George Washington cautioned the United States to not become involved in the affairs of Europe and the rest of the world, and to instead be concerned with its own issues. As the nation developed, however, that advice fell to the wayside; the country instead became more powerful and more connected to the world. Especially since the late 19th century, the United States became increasingly more connected with worldwide systems of labor, migration, and economics. The country’s connection to worldwide economic systems led to American industries becoming incredibly powerful, forever changing American markets. This growth of industry also lead to social evolution, a reaction to the change brought on by industry. …show more content…
As transportation became easier, more Europeans moved to the United States, especially from southern and eastern Europe. These immigrants were resisted by those who considered themselves natives, people who thought the immigrants were taking jobs and changing America for the worse. This anti-immigrant sentiment gave rise to laws such as the Immigration Act of 1921 and the Immigration Act of 1924. These laws established what were called “immigration quotas,” which in the case of the Act of 1924, restricted immigration visas to two percent of the number of people of a nationality who were already living in the US as of the 1890 census. Anti-immigrant sentiment, often a common theme in America, was put on full display by these laws. Despite these restrictive laws, millions of people immigrated to America. They provided a cheap and plentiful workforce for American industries, so much so that industry became depended on European immigrants for labor. When World War One started, immigration from Europe slowed down significantly, and there was a labor shortage in northern factories. As a result, many African Americans moved to cities in the North during the early 20th century, looking to work in those vacant jobs. This mass movement of millions of African Americans has come to be called the Great Migration. The Great Migration had significant impacts on the demographics of American cities, and on the attention paid to the rights of African Americans, as many of the migrants were able to vote and influence politics for the first time once they were out of southern areas that restricted their voting rights. The effects of these migrations, both domestic and foreign, impacted American policy and attitudes for decades, even up to the present

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    From the time period 1880-1925, racism and tension steadily grew towards immigrants and the United States government made radical changes to regulate immigration. During the early stages of the Gilded Age, the country was in dire need of a more expendable labor force to keep pace with the demands of factories and large corporations. People constantly looked for better ways to expand their wealth and if business owners had to pay their workers less, the more profitable the relationship. Therefore, the vast majority of Americans had a positive view of immigrants and welcomed their existence into the country with open arms (Document A). In the 1880s, there were very few laws that…

    • 1114 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Cities were becoming even more populated and jobs could be found easily in factories. This annoyed and outraged white Americans as they did not want to coexist with African Americans. By the time World War II ended, there was another shift in the demographic, but this consisted of the whites moving out of the cities and into suburbs. This shift was only possible for the people who could afford it, thus leaving the cities filled with the poorer populations of white people and African Americans. This shift was one that was parallel to the Great Migration: the white Americans wanted to get away from a certain population and find a better place to live, just like African Americans who previously lived in the south.…

    • 973 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Angel Island was more strict than Ellis Island and this prevented many chinese immigrants from coming to America. Another way this time period impacted America’s identity was the Great Migration. The Great Migration was when over one million slaves from the south left and went up to the north. The slaves from the south migrated to the north for more opportunities and because the people in the north respected them not as badly as they were treated in the south. This increased the population of northern cities in the hundreds of…

    • 949 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Initially, “over ninety out of every hundred lie in areas predominantly Negro”creating a Black belt effect. (St Clare Drake and Horace R. Cayton 174) However, due to the rapid growth of Afrian-Americans migrating to the city and the increasing economic success of black workers, some neighborhoods became mixed-raced. Although, many were opposed “I hate them all, all of them, “if I have to depend on a son-of-a-bitch for it, I’ll turn the key in the door first”( St Clare Drake and Horace R. Cayton 191), there was a sense of two races peacefully co-existing in other neighborhoods- “We 're not segreated here” and “I think Italians get along better with colored”. More so, the NAACP successfully argued that that “no decision against one owner for renting or selling to a Negro constituted a precedent binding others”(St Clare Drake and Horace R. Cayton 186) which was a huge success as not only did the Black community gain more political power but also, this case generated a lot of awareness towards the struggles and oppression of Black people living in urban cities. In fact, cities began to recognize and welcome the influx of Black citizens,“Does the negro make a good home buyer and carry through is purchase to completion?...17 of the 18 cities reported YES.” (St Clare Drake and Horace R. Cayton 192) In conclusion, in the long term mass migration impacted the sociology…

    • 716 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    So 80% of America goes to war with their neighbor, their friend, their brother. More than 1,264,000 people are killed in the civil war. They preserved the union, but at what cost? Racism also prevailed in both regions. Though, you don’t hear about racism often in the North; Immigrants coming across the Atlantic from Europe began to consume the cities in the north on the east coast because of job opportunities offered by the new factories, as well as the country side since fertile land was more abundant than Europe.…

    • 1179 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Effects Of The Gilded Age

    • 996 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The problem was once they arrived and found a job, it was not as wonderful as it seemed . It was called the Gilded Age because, from the outside, everything looked wonderful, but on the inside it was spoiled. During America’s industrialization era, the immigration numbers skyrocketed, the quality of working conditions plummeted, and the environment suffered. The industrialization era brought people to American cities in excessive numbers and led to tenement houses, ghettos and nativism. Immigrants from all over the world were going to American cities for a better life but instead ended up living in tenement houses.…

    • 996 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    20th Century Texas

    • 1408 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Some would move to the cities to find employment in factors or with railroad companies. The railroads created a huge boost to the economy. They created jobs in all industries they affected. They opened up jobs in the oil, lumber, steel, and railroad industries to get products out much faster. African Americans faced serious discrimination and would not make much money or be rejected for the job.…

    • 1408 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Obama's Immigration Reform

    • 1475 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Many say they would not be able to assimilate, or blend with American culture, would take all the jobs and take all the government benefits from Americans without paying taxes. "There are widespread popular beliefs that immigrants take jobs that would otherwise go to native born Americans and that the wages of native born workers are depressed by the presence of immigrant workers." (Hirschman, 2014). This supports the evidence that Americans have this negative mindset to foreign coming to the United States. On the other hand, immigration is a great profit to the United States.…

    • 1475 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Market Revolution in America The tide initial a new civil revolution in daily business and national wealth. Under the pressure of war debt and positive economic environment, Americans started their own Market Revolution. They established better road system for transportation and communication; they built factories as powerhouses of economy; they invent steamboat, train and car after the Second Industrial Revolution replacing horses and carriage. Under such climate, the Market Revolution also had profound impacts of the ordinary people. Not only just becoming wealthier, but they also had a different life style compared to their forefathers`.…

    • 1506 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Discrimination against Immigrants in the USA During the late 1800’s and the early 1900’s many people immigrated to the United States from Europe and Asia hoping that they would find prosperity and a better life from the one they were leading back at their homeland. One of the reasons was the industrialization of Europe. In fact the transformation from small, agriculture based societies to manufacturing economies was amazingly fast, that people who didn’t get used to this new way of living decided to migrate to America. But when they arrived there they didn’t find what they expected. Nearly 12 million people migrated to America between 1892 and 1924.…

    • 609 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays