American Hegemony In Vietnam

Better Essays
The Vietnamese conflict which gradually evolved after WW2 came about through Vietnamese nationalism born of European colonialism and the emergence of American hegemony. European born imperialism transformed and aggravated Vietnamese nationalism which spurred on and enflamed the on-going conflict between South and North Vietnam. Vietnamese nationalism was harnessed by the leaders of resistance against colonial powers such as Ho Chi Minh. Ho’s ideology was developed from sides of Marxism due to the fact that the USA did not want to support Vietnamese independence and looked for support from the emerging Socialist powers USSR and China. This change in political stance by Ho was also brought about by the fall of China to Mao’s Communist party …show more content…
From the end of WW2, the vast empires of Europe had begun to collapse and the US saw this is as a chance to replace the Europeans. American hegemony came to dominate the globe after WW2, and therefore the US administrations throughout the 1941-1975 looked to assert their dominance around the world, especially in underdeveloped countries which boasted important natural resources. American hegemony came to replace the dwindling European world dominance; this hegemony continued throughout the period and was the main driving factor behind American involvement in Vietnam which “was rooted in hubristic power-projection” The gradual transition from European dominance into American hegemony around the globe is summarised by General Giap’s comment on US involvement in Vietnam “the aggressive war waged by French colonialist gradually became a war carried out with US dollars”. Through these “US dollars” the US sought to rebuild Asia after the devastating WW2 campaign of the Japanese in order to create powerful trading partners. The combination of the growth in Vietnamese nationalism and the encroachment of US hegemonic policies created a conflict which contrasted two different scenarios which were deeply rooted within US and Vietnamese leadership and …show more content…
American-backed French resistance against Vietnamese independence set the foundation to the future total invasion of Vietnam by the USA. The failure by the French to supress Vietnamese nationalism and talks of independence resulted in the Geneva Accords, whereby Vietnamese hopes of total autonomy were becoming reality and created a public and leadership which were adamant on achieving full independence. The Geneva Accords resulted in 2 new countries and 2 new leaderships. In the South, American-backed Ngo Dinh Diem assumed leadership which was not only unpopular with the South Vietnamese but also enflamed the Vietnamese push towards independence. Throughout Diem’s leadership, many of the South Vietnamese saw the Socialist stance of the North more appealing than the Capitalist stance of the South. As Latham states, “why was communism a better alternative? It redistributed political power unlike Diem’s repression”. Diem’s rejection of the Geneva Accords and the use of rigged elections to push himself into power further created instability within the country, encouraging the already disillusioned population to be hostile towards the South Vietnamese leadership. By 1955, the Chinese and Soviet Union had also started to become involved within the situation in Vietnam. China and

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    The end of the war ushered in a new era of nationalism and allowed America to progress industrially. Before the War of 1812 had officially begun there was animosity that had forced the country to take opposing sides. Jeffersonian Republicans believed heavily in the war efforts. They considered England’s repeated disregard to their maritime laws as an insult to the nation’s honor. Southerners wished to go to war because the trade embargoes set in place hurt the southern agricultural system that had been set in place.…

    • 1361 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Communism In Vietnam Essay

    • 1585 Words
    • 7 Pages

    To what extent did the containment of communism in Vietnam reflect the high ideals of the Truman Doctrine and the spread of democracy? ESSAY Introduction World War Two crippled Europe and Asia and left only two countries standing, the superpowers of the Soviet Union and the United States. These countries had very different ideologies, the Soviet Union was communist and the United States was capitalist. The Soviet Union was a totalitarian regime and the US was democratic. Both countries wanted the world to take on their ideology and a struggle began between them to expand their ideology globally.…

    • 1585 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    A counter cultural group the Yippies took imaginative action, raided offices of draft boards, and Civil Rights leader, Martin Luther King, also spoke against the war. Other non-violent action such as blockades of roads and streets became common. The Tet offensive conducted by North Vietnam on January 30, 1968 shocked the American public. It can be said that the Tet offensive was a turning point in the war because it influenced the American public who realized that the entire war was senseless and there was no strategy to end the war. The Tet offensive occurred around the same time that the government considered General Westmoreland’s request for 206,000 additional troops.…

    • 1267 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Why was President Truman criticized for his response to the communist revolution in China? President Truman was criticized for his response to the communist revolution in China due to the CCP’s ability to grow their influence not only in China but also in neighboring territories. Therefore, communism continued to spread, which was against the ideologies of many Americans. In a way, the blame that Truman’s administration associated with the disastrous…

    • 734 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Why did the United States find it so difficult to ends its involvement in the Vietnam War? In this essay, I will outline and explore the reasoning behind the United States involvement and withdrawal from Vietnam and why the decision to withdraw from the war, was one of great complexity. The Vietnam War was a civil war fought between the communist’s states of North Vietnam and the capitalist South. The North Vietnamese wanted to join with the south as one united communist country. Whilst the communists in the North were supported by the Soviet Union and other countries who favoured communism, the South was supported by anti-communist countries primarily, the United States.…

    • 1926 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Cold War can be seen as the root of America’s involvement in Vietnam. The US followed a strict policy of containment as implemented by President Truman. This policy stated that the United States would supply financial aid to any country that was under the threat of becoming communist. At first, the US was only indirectly involved in Vietnam. The Vietnamese were tiring of being under colonialist rule and therefore came into conflict with France, who had colonised their country in the late 1800s.…

    • 1192 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Both these revolutions were inspired by the ideas of the Enlightenment period. The colony members were tired of obeying the dominate British rule and rebelled. America fought Britain for freedom, the British imposed taxes on the colonies to show their dominance, but Britain was too far away to closely control the colony revolt. They ultimately gained it and created the independent federal republic. “The Declaration of Independence drew deep inspiration from Enlightenment political thoughts in justifying the colonies’ quest of independence” (pg.…

    • 1604 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The French and American War of Independence had similarities and conflicts. The revolution and American War of Independence were the samples of civilian’s rebellion against their regime. The French rebelled against their government during a violent fashion, as did the Americans. Britain’s treasury was drained in order that they taxed America and infuriated the colonists; almost like the French treasury being low, in order that they declared war on alternative states to undertake to fill again the treasury; French, and War of American Independence had their own declarations and constitutions written. Each country won their revolutions; Besides, France, wished a brand new government and extra money and food offer; but the America simply wished their independence from land; but America was burdensome issues and numbers from land that were laborious on them; and France were those laborious on others for cash to refill them provides.…

    • 571 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Vietnam War Role

    • 839 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Vietnam War is the most significant confrontation that created a long-lasting controversy and split up in the American society. The War started when North Vietnam attempted to impose a single communist regime in the region to match China and the Soviet Union. On the other hand, the South Vietnamese government struggled to maintain a democratic country that is closely aligned to the U.S. Therefore, the South Vietnamese government received back up from America, The North Vietnamese regime, received assistance from the Communist great powers. Perhaps, the American main problem was not the poor strategy, but underestimation of the Viet Cong tenacity.…

    • 839 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Today, people are more skeptical of big corporations, of imperialism, and of capitalism. People involved in the movement expanded their open minded thinking, anti-racist, and anti-imperialist ideas. The movement brought in climate which kept the government’s ruling class from intervening in many future wars such as one in Angola (Montchair). The Vietnam war was arguably the most controversial battle in United States history. U.S. Citizens ' rights, especially the minorities and poor, were taken away in the country 's failed attempt to 'contain ' the spread of Communism and stop the Soviet Union 's influence in the world.…

    • 1011 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays