American Civil Rights Essay

2426 Words Sep 22nd, 2013 10 Pages
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American Civil Rights Movement
Introduction
The American Civil Rights Movement was a mass protest movement which was against discrimination and racial segregation in southern United States. The American Civil Rights Movement came into national prominence during the period of mid-1950s. The roots of this movement can be traced to the era of African slaves where their descendants started resisting racial oppression and they also advocated for the abolishment of slavery. This effectively led to the American slaves being emancipated due to the Civil War and they were also granted vital civil rights. These civil rights were granted during the Fourteenth and the Fifteenth amendments were done to the US
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Recent research has show that despite equal rights being elaborately outlined in the United States founding documents, a lot of new inhabitant’s in the country were denied the essential rights. Indentured servants and African slaves were not accorded the inalienable right to pursuit of happiness, liberty and life that the British colonists utilized to validate their Declaration of the American Independence. They were also not included among the people of the US who had established the US Constitution for the purposes of promoting general welfare and securing the noble Blessings of the people of America and their posterity. The US Constitution instead only protected slavery through the allowance of slaves’ importation until 1808 and it also provided for the return of slaves that had escaped to the other states (Adamson, 11).
Research also elaborately shows that as the US effectively expanded its boundaries, the Native American people resisted absorption and conquest. The individual states determined the majority of the American citizens’ rights by limiting generally the voting rights that only allowed the white property-owning males. The other rights that individual states determined were the right to serve on juries and the right to own land. The Native American people were…

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