The Archetype Of The Gibson Girls

Great Essays
America has a long standing tradition of constantly evolving their ideal beauty standards. For example, there was a gradual shift in the 2000’s when models like Kate Moss and Naomi Campbell traded in their stick thin aesthetic for a still thin but athletic curvy figure such as models like Kylie Jenner and Gigi Hadid. The progression of Americas beauty has a global presence that affects many nations. In the beginning of the United States existence their standards of beauty were similar to much of western Europe. The United states didn’t establish their own terms of beauty until the late 1800s when the female archetype of the “Gibson girl” had been established. The Gibson girl was an illustration created by Charles Dana Gibson who believed these …show more content…
Men had become to gain a new worry. The fear of acceptance in society through their looks. As the eighties and nineties rolled around men had become more prevalent in the world of beauty. Their standard was changing just as much as the women’s. With an emphasis on men being extremely fit. Men with larger muscles and a bigger frame had begun to become favored and adored. With models like Mark Wahlberg becoming a role model in this movement. Men are beginning to see this sudden change in their idea of beauty and that their idea of masculinity will change throughout the …show more content…
However, this movement is not only working to show the validity of black lives in this country, but Black Lives Matter is using their power to empower men and women and show them that the color of their skin does not affect who they are and their beauty. The hashtag known as “Blackout day” is a popular way for these men and women to show the world that beauty is defined by one archetype. The term “Blackout day” originated in March of 2016, when the hashtag had begun to spread across giant social media sites such as Tumblr, Instagram, and Twitter. The hashtag consists of black people posting pictures or “selfies” of themselves creating a space of positivity and safety for those who do not feel comfortable in their own skin. The hashtag was to show a form representation in the media as often what the representation black people do receive is a uni-dimensional idea of what it means to be black. Black Live Matter doesn’t just stop there with empowerment one hashtag. Members of this group advocate natural hair. Many women of the black community are finding themselves letting go of the hair that has been placed in their scalp and hair that is hurt by the chemicals and replacing it with the hair they were born with. Black women are taught by society that curly, and afro-like hair is not the ideal type of hair and as a result damage their own hair to create a façade. They are taught that natural

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    “African Americans are being slowly elbowed out of our own spaces and aesthetics, and back into a world that displays open contempt for everything we create or do, so long as we’re the ones partaking in it” (Walker). In America, African American hair is considered “bad hair” by white beauty standards. With its kinky and coily texture, it’s no wonder the word nappy has often been used to describe black hair. This hatred of black hair has manifested its self into a multi-million dollar industry of beauty supply chains and real hair weaves used by many women today. From a young age black girls are taught that straight long hair is “good hair”.…

    • 1068 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Good Hair Film Analysis

    • 2307 Words
    • 9 Pages

    In todays society the media constantly shows and glamorizes the hair of other races outside of African Americans. The term “good hair” is often associated with straight, long and silky hair types. Instead African American women hair is associated with terms like thick, kinky and nappy. These aren’t just terms anymore that are used freely instead, they’ve become very stereotypical and judgmental to the black race. This puts pressure on African American women to feel doubtful of their natural hair, so much that black women use chemicals to make their hair silky straight, which ultimately result in damaged hair.…

    • 2307 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    At the interlude between “pray you catch me” and “hold up” Beyoncé uses a spoken word written by Warsan Shire which states “I tried to change/Closed my mouth more/Tried to be softer, prettier – less awake”. The significance of this excerpt is the fact that it ties in well with her over-all struggle with being a black celebrity in a world that expects her to be a form of black that is acceptable. It is also a reflection of what a black woman must do in order to be accepted and fit into this society. By “less awake” Beyoncé is referring to the pressure she has felt to remain out off not speaking up about the issues that have plagued her community. This ties in well with the fact that after the slaying of Trayvon Martin while many celebrities…

    • 1204 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Black Hair Culture

    • 1277 Words
    • 6 Pages

    This ideal comes from the belief that black women feel something is innately wrong with them therefore changing the appearance of their hair will help them feel better about themselves. This is evident by the large number of black women who opt to cover/ alter their hair. Society has created a fence between black and white hair. Hair that is straighten or relaxed is deemed as beautiful and hair that a kinky or woolly “nappy” is considered ugly and undesirable. Nia Long, an American actress, during and interview with Rock, discuss the pressures within the black communities, stating “when you have good hair, you’re better than the brown skin girl with the afro, …, and natural hair styles”.…

    • 1277 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Have you ever been judged by something that you cannot possibly change about yourself? For most black women around the world, we are judged by the very characteristics that make us black. Because these so called ‘differences’ separate us from every other race and gender, people who are different from us and do not understand black women and want us to conform to the standard look and attitude. For some it is the “unmanageable” hair that stops us from getting a job, so why not get a relaxer? For others it is the “thick voice” that stops people from listening to what we actually have to say.…

    • 845 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Essay On Black Beauty

    • 816 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Influenced by the pressures of white society, media, and also the preferences of our male counterparts, the image of beauty is a term used as means to change and alter the minds of women. Specifically, I would like to address how these ideologies have led black women to feel insecure about their own bodies. TLC’s music video to the song, “Unpretty” released on YouTube in 2010, is an ode to women to tell us…

    • 816 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Areva Martin wrote an article, titled The Hatred of Black Hair Goes Beyond Ignorance, about her personal experience with her hair and the discrimination she has faces stating, "I joined black student organizations where chemically processed hair was seen as a throwback to the era of white suppression. In order to be a card-carrying progressive, you had to embrace your natural hair," (Motto). She also mentions that white hair is set as the precedent due to British colonists thinking that African hair is closer to sheep wool than human hair. These types of oppressive stereotypes have not only caused women to change their hair, by using relaxers, braiding, weaves, etc. but go deeper into racial stereotypes.…

    • 1077 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Self-Help Lesson

    • 825 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Lesson 3 starts off asking what is your worth as a black woman? This question takes time to think about because it a hard question to answer as a black woman. Our self- worth has us feeling unworthy due to the color of our skin. The media has power over what black women think of themselves and once were caught up in it, that’s when we begin to doubt ourselves. Black women perceptions of themselves have changed because of the things we say to ourselves that we will never say out loud such as: I wish my skin was lighter, I wish my hair was more like a white woman or at least not so course or nappy, or I feel in competition with white women or light skinned women.…

    • 825 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    To remedy this dual discrimination, they felt that they needed to form their own feminist groups that would address the dual discrimination. At the time the black feminism movement came into being, black feminist felt that they were racially oppressed in the women’s feminism movement, and at the same time sexually oppressed in the black liberation movement. Many of them argued that the word ‘black’ was synonymous with the black male and the word ‘woman’ was used to refer to white women. That resulted in a situation that did not favor black women in either the black liberation movement or the women’s feminism movement . The black women were in effect rendered ‘invisible’ by the society and the dual discrimination against them.…

    • 1067 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Angela Davis Feminism

    • 1436 Words
    • 6 Pages

    One should never bother they way people thing about the black women. Moreover, the black models should also have to go for their own unique styles. The purpose of the movement is to crush the existing stereotype about the black women. Media considers the black women to be bitter, arrogant, obese, and physically strong yet vulnerable to the domestic violence. The movement intends to work out a way of living for the women which are the natural way.…

    • 1436 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays