Modern Architecture In America

Improved Essays
The term "Modernism" refers to activities and creations of those who felt the traditional forms were becoming ill-fitted to their tasks and outdated in the new economic, social, and political environment of an emerging fully industrialized world. Modernists often use ideas and methods which are very different from those used in the past. The following essay includes a total of 6 readings which can be summarized into 3 categories: Modernism in European countries, Modernism in Soviet Russia and China, and, Art Deco. Apart from the summary of the readings, the essay also covered the similarities of modern architecture in America influencing the modernism trend around the globe and different purposes of modernism presented in the readings. …show more content…
The reading by Cohen talked about the architecture during the modernization in Soviet Russia in 1917 to mid-1930s. Cohen started off mentioning the failed efforts of the Moscow Architectural Preservation to preserve the traditional architecture style of Soviet Russia, then went on with the influence of the Russian Revolution on the prosper of modern architecture in 1917 and ended by talking about the put over of modernism due to the political disturbance in the mid-1930s. He categorized modernism in Russia into three dynamics: architectural commission, construction techniques and form, and also, generally talked about other aspects contributed in and benefited from the period. The reading by Denison and Ren talked about the evolution of modernism in China in 1917 to mid-1930s. The authors began by mentioning the closed system that the Chinese used to follow, then went on by describing how the decline of Qing Dynasty impacted the Chinese revivalism, in which the Chinese architects started to incorporate Western Classicism in their style of building. Numerous examples of buildings, associations and social events that witnessed the development of modernism in China have listed …show more content…
While Le Corbusier, the famous American architect was obviously one of the pioneers of this movement. This phenomenon can be seen particularly in reading 2,3,5 and 6. In reading 2, the author first mentioned how China was used to be a country that stayed with traditional visions and believed modernism was all about traditionalism and nationalism only. However, the Yung Wing Mission started in 1850 has set a pathway for the Chinese to go to America for further studies. Although the mission was canceled in a glimpse, it was considered as the beginning of the Chinese Revivalism, a phenomenon were Chinese architects were convinced of Western Classicism. Examples like the Wing On and Sincere Building in the Hong Kong and the formation of architecture firms were also evidence that the Chinese began to adapt to the Western architecture style. Similarly, the technical competence of the American architects mentioned in Reading 5 also took part in influencing the movement around the globe. For instance, the Gianicolo built by McKim, Mead & White in Rome in 1913 has shown the precise detailing that the Americans were chasing for, in which inspired the modern work of the Italians in the interwar period. Furthermore, reading 3 and 6 also shown a strong emphasis on the impact of Le Corbusier to this global movement. Le Corbusier has always

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