The Presidency History

1656 Words 7 Pages
The Presidency is arguably the most fascinating, and complex element of the American political system; due in part to the constitutional ambiguity that surrounds the office. Often, the people, the President, and the Constitution all have varying expectations about the role and duties of the presidency. Which in turn are not always seated in the realm of what is actually possible. The Presidency, according to the Founders, could be best described as limited. For, it is Congress that was meant to be the main body of governance. Yet, such a powerful institution would need a near equal entity to keep it in check, queue the Presidency. A model similar to that of the Roman Consul, that was elected by, and thus accountable to the people and …show more content…
And constitutionally possessing very little influence on the Domestic Policy of the United States. Though the Presidency has evolved over time to encompass more roles due to the ambitions of those in office, and expectations of the people, facilitated by the vagueness in the wording of Article II. This evolution has created what Jeffrey Tulis coins as the "Two Constitutions Presidencies". These two presidencies are defined by the amount and kind of power the president possess. One being his Expressed Powers explicitly granted to him by the Constitution., this makes up the first presidency. Then his Implied Powers that are not explicitly stated, but are created to help him perform his duties and gain authority through the vagueness of Article II; this is the second presidency. It is due to this ambiguity that the president 's role has expanded over time, creating new roles and duties for the office; as well as expanding already existing roles and …show more content…
The strength of the economy is now a close concomitant of a successful presidency. Thus, becoming an important yardstick for measuring presidential performance. Although, the President doesn 't actually have any significant control over the state of the economy. The President can negotiate trade treaties, and can influence trade and fiscal policy, but can really only use his soft power to influence the economy. Making this a prime example of public expectations far exceeding what the President actually has the power to do. Exemplars of the economy having a significant impact on the legacy of a presidency are Herbert Hoover during the beginning of the Greta Depression, and 90 's economic boom under Bill

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