The Development Of Alzheimer's Disease

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Introduction The development of Alzheimer’s disease tends to be a slow progression at first although the disease can progress rapidly in each stage without warning. Some people tend to stay at a certain stage for a long time without any dramatic change. Alzheimer’s is one of the main forms of dementia besides vascular dementia, mixed dementia, frontotemporal dementia and Parkinson’s. At first it begins with memory gaps here and there but then progresses to not remembering your closest family members. The downfalls of this disease is how it shows visual decline in ability to recognize objects or people, decline in motor skills, decline in comprehensive function required to complete a task and disability in not able to think with good judgment, …show more content…
In aging elders this is one of the diseases that lead to unsuccessful aging and a shorter lifespan. The exact reason for Alzheimer’s still remains a mystery although Alzheimer’s now is broken down into two categories which are early-onset which is 1-6% of all cases before the age of 60 years and late-onset which is the main type of Alzheimer’s which accounts for 94-99% of all cases. To this day there are three known genes that cause a mutation to cause future Alzheimer’s, they rest on the chromosomes 21, 14 and one. When mutations occur in the chromosomes they alter of how much of a protein is made and or what chemicals are being produced, blocked, or multiplied. At first the progression of Alzheimer’s tends to be slow but when the changes in the inside of the body can no longer work in system deterioration occurs quickly (Beyer, 2005). Although other research has been done that states that environmental causes can also cause genetic and environmental contributions to Alzheimer’s disease. Hendrie explains that ApoE levels and cholesterol levels can contribute to the risk of AD because as one increases the other one has to increase too. Then there are risks of how your diet and stress are because here again the risk of ApoE increasing is high because high calorie diets produce high …show more content…
Although with research that has been progressed it has been found it has to do with a chemical imbalance in the brain and chromosomes 24, 21, and one being affected in mutations. It was also seen that the person dealing with Alzheimer’s goes through seven stages through their progression although some people can move slow through these stages or relatively really fast. Alzheimer’s not only affects the person in their cognitive abilities but it also affects them psychologically by inflicting them with depression that later can lead to suicide thoughts. Consequences of this disease can take a toll on loved ones especially if they are the ones helping in the caring for the ones dealing with AD; there are many services available to those that are in need of help. Finding a cure for Alzheimer’s will always be the goal but for now constructing new methods to help in the biological and psychological department will remain important in making the person with AD feel as comfortable as they

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