Alzheimer's Disease: A Case Study

Improved Essays
Alzheimer’s disease is known to be the sixth leading cause of death for people age 65 and above. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), five million Americans were living with Alzheimer 's disease (AD) and it is projected to rise to 14 million by 2050 (2014). AD is a decay of the brain that causes loss of cognitive abilities and memory, which is the most common form of Dementia. Dementia is a broad term for memory loss and other intellectual abilities that are bad enough to cause a problem with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs). Plaques and tangles are the two prime suspects in destroying and killing nerve cells. The tangle and plaques worsen, as the person gets older and for people with AD it is very rapid. As the …show more content…
The memory loss is usually the most common sign of AD and the early stages of it. As the disease continues to spread it leads to difficulties in the domains of language, motor activity and object recognition (CDC, 2013). Older adults, who is cognitively impaired from AD, are sometimes confused and lost. For example, an individual with AD will often ask family members “who are you” or say, “I do not know you.” Sometimes they remember their loved one and people around them, but sometimes they do not. The more severe the condition the more memory lost. Individuals may have disruptive behaviors or mood changes due to the changes in the brain. Patricia Alpert explained that brain changes and disuse weakens the neuronal connectivity to receive, process, and transmit information (Alpert 2012: 74). This means that elders with AD learn new information slower and process slower. Their responses and reaction may be different from normal. People who have AD scored lower on the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) than their caregiver without dementia (Duke et al. 2002). This is because individual with AD have a hard time remembering things they were told to repeat or saw. The MMSE is involved with memory, the person taking the test has to remember and repeat the words that they were told at the beginning of the …show more content…
Individuals who have AD have mental or cognitive impaired. They are mentally impaired due the spreading tangle and plaque in the brains. They will not be able to remember a lot of things, even family members. The brain and body become dysfunctional because of the numerous dead brain cells. The individuals with AD become dependent on family and people around them who are still physically and cognitively functioning. They are incapable of helping theirs selves with their ADLs. Individuals with AD wanders and family fear for them being lost or injured. Wandering can cause injuries and also death as a result of injuries. Keeping close supervision will truly help improve the individuals’ health and life

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The signs and symptoms of stage 1 are generally short-term memory loss, mild cognitive and judgment impairment, misplacing items and being unable to retrace steps. Also, the patient may be seen as socially and mentally withdrawn and have mild decline of being able to perform simple hygiene tasks. During this stage, the patient’s family and friends begin to notice problems with memory and judgement. Stages 4 and 5 of Alzheimer’s is described as moderate. The signs and symptoms typically worsen, the patient becomes disoriented to time and place, and they start to need more help performing activities of daily life.…

    • 983 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In moderate Alzheimer’s, there is now profound damage in the areas of the brain that control language, reasoning and sensory processing. There may be increased memory loss and confusion, difficulty recognizing family and friends, inability to learn new tasks, hallucinations, delusions, paranoia and impulsive behavior (“About Alzheimer’s Disease”). In the severe stages of Alzheimer’s disease, individuals affected are not able to communicate and are dependent on others for their care. In this stage, symptoms include weight loss, seizures, skin infections, difficulty swallowing, groaning, moaning or grunting, sleeping more and lack of control of bowel and bladder (“About Alzheimer’s…

    • 1374 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Groups of nerve cells have special jobs. Some are involved in thinking, learning and remembering.” b. http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_what_is_alzheimers.asp i. Second stages of Alzheimer’s disease start to change the behavior of the person to a high extent. Clients are not as aware of their feelings and emotions and have a complete change in their personality. This causing them to become less aware of their actions and how they treat others.…

    • 552 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The person will also experience memory loss that could affect their job, and the often misplacing of things. As the disease progresses the person will begin to have problems with abstract thinking and intellectual functioning, and they will become agitated, irritable, and quarrelsome. Considered to be in the later stages of the disease are symptoms such as disorientation and confusion of what month and even year it is, as well as the person not knowing where he or she lives. The forgetting of the names of close relatives or even their own names, becoming violent, wandering off, not being able to engage in a conversation, having erratic moods and behaviors, and loss of bladder control are among the many symptoms an Alzheimer's patient suffers in the later part of the…

    • 1831 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    The Definition Of Dementia

    • 2114 Words
    • 9 Pages

    People who suffer from this condition often are bad at decision making, planning, and organizing things in their lives (“Types of Dementia”). Compared to a person with Alzheimer’s, one with Vascular dementia have a more rapid rate of memory loss, meaning they have more of a sudden memory loss (“About Dementia”). A patient with Vascular dementia would also have the emotion of not caring, also called being nonchalant. It’s not something the person can fix, and therefore the caregiver will have to be very patient and calm when caring for him. Getting angry will just make everything worse.…

    • 2114 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    What Is Alzheimer's?

    • 980 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Many people are suddenly hit with Alzheimer’s and it’s a tragic and sad thing. It’s very hard having a family member with Alzheimer’s and see them suffer. At the end of this report you will have more knowledge about Alzheimer’s. Many researchers have said that the development of Alzheimer’s usually comes from heredity, old age or…

    • 980 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The World Alzheimer Report of 2012 states the shame associated with being in the devalued group leads many people to avoid finding out whether they are, in fact, members of that group. This stigma leads many people with dementia to avoid discussing the illness with their primary care physicians until the symptoms are so severe that it is apparent to everyone. A delay in proper diagnosis and potential treatment of dementia can have many negative repercussions for the sufferer and others. A dementia person may often look for some attention to rectify their distress, boredom, illness or excess energy (Downs & Bowers…

    • 1006 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This disease disrupts very important processes that the nerve cells must carry out in order to survive, including communication, metabolism, and repair. At first, the disease impair nerve cells and their communication in the parts of the brain that are involved in memory. Eventually, the disease destroys the parts of the brain that deal with language, social behavior and reasoning. Afterwards, more and more parts of the brain become damaged and the person becomes unresponsive to the outside…

    • 1779 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Alzheimer's Case Study

    • 1436 Words
    • 6 Pages

    In the final stages all the symptoms mentioned they have all gotten severe in the decline. Also, physical appearance may deteriorate. Patients may be bed ridden and of patient are not using all of their muscles that begin to atrophy and person will lose weight. This will affect motor defects as well like not being able to walk or do thing for themselves. Cognitive and memory abilities are severely affected person is not able to do anything by…

    • 1436 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer’s, which at its worst case is referred to as dementia, is a progressive disease that eats away at the brain and controls the ability to function (Horr 2015) According to Mitchell Clionsky, this disease is common among people of older age causing a mental dysfunction triggering the ability to think, remember and reason as well as behavioral abilities. (Clionsky 2015) These factors can drastically affect the body emotionally. Some patients get frustrated and mad due to not remembering certain tasks that needed to be completed. It’s definitely not easy to have a disease like this, to forget the memories, the last phone call conversation or to even forget what was consumed for breakfast. People diagnosed will eventually…

    • 1146 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays

Related Topics