Alzheimers Disease (AD): The Cause, Causes And Effects Of Alzheimer's Disease

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Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is a degenerative disorder of the brain that leads to memory deficiency (Anderson, 2014). According to Anderson (2014), AD affects 5.4 million Americans and the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Severe memory loss, characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease, is not a normal sign of aging. Chemical and structural changes in the brain slowly destroy the ability remember, recognize errors, and comprehend emotions. The cells begin to die, resulting to personality loss and body functions begin to fail. Economically, AD is a major public health problem, costing about 183 billion dollars with the services for ages 65 and older (Anderson, 2014). Alzheimer’s develops within a …show more content…
Some may get these categories confused thinking they are the same concept. Memory loss is a characteristic of AD, but not of normal aging. Healthy aging usually involves the gradual loss of hair, muscle mass, and height. A decrease in auditory, vision, and metabolic rate may occur. It is normal to have a little decline in memory, including slower recall of information, but not to the point it impacts daily living. Dementia is known for the reduction of cognitive abilities, this can be severe enough to affect with social interactions. The result from different diseases could cause damage to the brain cells. The different types of dementia vary in causes and symptoms. Vascular dementia has a decrease in blood flow to the brain; this is one example of the different cause (Bayer, 2011). AD is the most commonly seen and caused by buildup of beta-amyloid plaques in the …show more content…
In 1906, a German physician Dr. Alois Alzheimer’s identified a collection of brain cell abnormalities as a form of dementia. One of the doctor’s patients died after years of severe memory problems, confusion, and difficulty understanding questions (History of AD, 2008). Upon the patient’s death while performing a brain autopsy, the doctor noted dense deposits surrounding the nerve (neuritic plaques). Inside the nerve cells, he observed twisted bands of fibers (neurofibrillary tangles). Today this degenerative brain disorder bears his name, and when found during an autopsy, these plaques and tangles mean a definite diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (History of AD, 2008). Since its discovery, more than one hundred years ago, there have been more scientific breakthroughs in AD research. Scientists discovered a link between cognitive decline and the number of plaques and tangles in the brain in 1960’s. The Medical community then formally recognized Alzheimer’s as a disease and not a normal part of aging (History of AD, 2008). In 1970’s, scientists made great strides to understanding the human body as a whole and AD emerged as a significant area of research interest. Alzheimer’s disease increased attention in the 1990’s. Important discoveries and a better understanding of complex nerve cells in the brain of AD patients, over the last

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