Social Work Intervention

1117 Words 4 Pages
Preventative measures and early intervention help social workers resolve issues before they reach crisis point, therefore minimising the onset of long-term problems and the need for extra support (Wilson et al, 2011). Not only do social workers identify and address issues which could, potentially, impact lives, but they alleviate the barriers by introducing supportive services which are tailored to individual needs. During difficult periods, self-esteem and motivation to do anything is usually low. This can lead to dependency as people neither want to, nor feel capable of, overcoming challenges alone. Assistance, however, can reverse this pattern and encourage independence by helping people adapt to changes in life. Alterations in attitude …show more content…
This attitude is to reduce the number of claimants as with funding deficits there are insufficient resources to cater for everyone. Thus, people are prioritised on the basis of whether they are in receipt of informal help. When it is shown that an individual is receiving assistance, support is disallowed as the need is viewed as already being addressed (Doty, 1986). This action, however, can prove disempowering for both parties. Not only can those reliant on aid believe they are an encumbrance to others, but the denial of support pressurises carers into feeling compelled with continuing caring duties (Oliver et al, 2014). Poulshock and Deimling (1984) evidences that ‘burdens’ are synonymous with families caring for elders as both commonly experience negative effects to their mental and physical health. The decline in well-being may plummet to a level which warrants attention. This can lead to a reverse effect situation as new demands for services may exceed those initially. The intension of The Care Act 2014 was to dispel the disempowering effect of previous laws which focused on what authorities could provide, rather than what the individual felt was needed (Lamb, 2014). Although, according to Johns (2014:83) it has contributed to ‘a hierarchy of entitlement’ where people are seen as more deserving than others. Consequently, disabled individuals who are …show more content…
Yet despite anti-discrimination laws, prejudice is still evident as inaccessibility of health services is common amongst older people. An example would be the low number of elderly individuals receiving Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) even though it is a widely used medical treatment. It has been found that few older people get referred which possibly suggests GPs have an ageist attitude (Wilkinson, 2009). Section 8 of The Equality Act, however, states providing professionals ‘objectively justify’ decisions, their actions are upheld. Anti-discriminatory practice is a core value within social work, yet it disregards situations presenting through legal guidelines as they direct intervention and constitutes part of their obligation. Likewise maintaining personal wellbeing is an integral part of practice, but prioritising severity hardly follows the mandate of ‘early intervention’ as cases are only dealt with when they are already problematic and a hindrance to health. Nevertheless with limited funding a way of allocating scarce resources is essential to ensure it is rationed to those most needy. Although distribution may not be fair as the decision-maker, who agrees entitlement, could be influenced by conjecture or personal

Related Documents