Allusions In Game Of Thrones

2126 Words 9 Pages
Game of Thrones is an ideal example of why the mass media is drawn to the apocalyptic-fiction genre and can be attributed to the connection between fiction and reality. Internally, within the mind, there is a psychological interest in endings and the end of the world. Externally, there is interest regarding historical events and personal religious beliefs. The apocalypse-fiction genre in modern media continues to become increasingly popular because many books and shows, such as George R.R. Martin’s Game of Thrones, revolve around intercultural and religious beliefs as well as historical events. Many apocalyptic themes drive the main storyline in Martin’s book series and HBO’s screen interpretation of Martin’s books. The ultimate plot of the …show more content…
One of the main allusions in Game of Thrones to religious texts is the second coming of an all-powerful savior whose light and strength will defeat the forces of darkness, magical, undead, humanoid beings known as the White Walkers as well as the Army of the Dead. The primary gods in Game of Thrones are “a set of seven archetypal gods” (O’Leary, pg. 1), also known as the “old gods,” and a god of light from another land far away from the realm of Westeros. Throughout the story of Game of Thrones, conflict arises between believers of the old gods and the believers of the Lord of Light much like real-life conflict between various religious groups. Martin writes that the Lord of Light, “Azor Ahai, [will] come again, and the darkness shall flee before him” (Martin, A Clash of Kings pg. 43). Azor Ahai is an allusion to the beliefs of a Jewish sect, who called themselves the Sons of Light, and the God of Israel. The Sons of Light believed that God would come to the “battle of annihilation for the Sons of Darkness” and “bring[ing] a permanent solution for the problem of evil (War Scroll, Dead Sea Scrolls). The battle for the Iron Throne between Azor Ahai and the White Walkers with their army of Wights and the battle between utopia and dystopia in Westeros exemplifies the battle between the forces of light and the forces of darkness in the ancient Middle …show more content…
Christian Bond’s article, 7 Historical Parallels to Game of Thrones, describes the historical allusions Martin uses for the foundation of the plot and several characters. Bond describes the religious practice of Zoroastrianism and compares it to the fantasy practice of the Red Faith. Zoroastrianism uses fire as a medium for spiritual practice and is very similar to the “religion of R’hllor [which] combines the cosmology of Zoroastrianism with the eschatology of Islam into a theodicy of conflagration: The Lord of Light will burn the imperfect world into new life” (O’Leary, Sacred Fantasy in Game of Thrones pg. 10). Further allusions include King Joffrey, embodying King Edward of Lancaster who, “‘though only 13 years of age, already talks of nothing but of cutting off heads or making war, as if he had everything in his hands or was the god of battle or the peaceful occupant of that throne’” (Bond). King Joffrey was a despised ruler by most characters in Game of Thrones for his unruly behavior, and his historical comparison to King Edward of Lancaster makes the fictional character more realistic. Furthermore, there is a connection between King Joffrey and the fourth “beast that crushed and devoured its victims and trampled underfoot whatever was left” (Daniel 7:19). In his dreams, Daniel describes four evil beasts, which symbolize the four

Related Documents