The Virtue Of Justiceness In Plato's The Republic

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Writing Assignment #1- option 1 Plato, a well-known 4th century philosopher, explored and dissected what a perfect society truly is. His findings were that a society either contains the concept of justiceness or it does not. This concept of justiceness is a way of keeping order and harmony within the society. In order to conceive such a society, Plato suggests that there must be a division of labor that maintains the economic functions. Plato proposes that each division has a virtue that coincides with their economic status. The status of a ruler, for example, must have a virtue that is based off of wisdom. For this reason, Plato created a school for rulers that banned anything that could distract the young people from the overall goal of obtaining “The Good”. The …show more content…
To obtain the final stage, knowledge, a person must be able to rely solely on reasoning and avoid their senses which could lead to opinion (Williams). Swapnil Srivastava, puts a vast emphasis on the fact that, in the allegory, the man was forced out of the cave and that his overall experience of advancing through the cognitive states was a painful one. This could imply that a person venturing outside of what he/she has been told to think could find reality concerning or that not knowing would be less complicated.
The just society Plato describes, where every individual fits into a particular class within a division of labor is utopian like thinking. Some may say that although it is a legitimate definition of a just society, it is also an impossible one. However, Plato was merely answering the question of how a just society would transpire. The allegory suggest that everyone has the ability to think for themselves and reach the stage of true knowledge, therefore there is a possibility of being just, but most likely only in individual form (Nelson,

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