Socrates Vs Plato

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Through the Allegory of the Cave, Euthyphro, the “Socratic Method” and Apology, Plato describes how his philosophical system allow one to live the good life through philosophical examination because the “unexamined life is not worth living”. For Plato, philosophy is a process of constant questioning, and questioning necessarily takes the form of dialogue. Plato believed there is a never ending, unchanging form for everything in the natural world that exists in the world of ideas. The core components of any philosophical system are metaphysics, ontology, epistemology, and ethics. Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy that explores fundamental questions, such as the nature of existence and reality. The relationship between ontology and metaphysics …show more content…
Three of the main themes in the “socratic method” are demystification, disentanglement, and de-concealment. Which are what philosophers are responsible for doing in their encounters of irrationality. In the euthyphro, one can see Socrates on his way to court for the charges that have been brought against him. On his way in, he meets a man named Euthyphro, who is a scholar of the law and is also very pompous. Euthyphro boast of his exact and perfect knowledge of all things related to religion, gods, and piety. Therefore, Socrates challenges Euthyphro to define piety. Eventually Euthyphro is unable to do so. Each possible definition is demolished by Socrates reasoning. One of the themes related with this dialogue is the quest for philosophical definitions. Socrates seeks a very specific response when he asks Euthyphro about piety. He is not only looking for a basic definition of piety. He wants to not only know the meaning of it, but why it's important and what it is in itself. We can relate this to Plato's personality and goals because both seek the wisdom and knowledge of reality. Socrates was looking for a more philosophical definition about the knowledge of piety. Socrates soon professes admiration for Euthyphro's knowledge. Socrates eventually begs him to become his …show more content…
What is needed to live this good life is that one become a master of himself by using his virtues to reflect his passions and personality. The main message that these stories are trying to say is that one should not fear the unknown. What is meant by that is that the fact that these stories have in common is that they show people were afraid of something different. For example, in the allegory of the cave the man that escaped and was able to see life for how it truly. When he returns the men that were still in the cave did not believe what he had to say and in the apology people were getting annoyed by what Socrates had to say they could not take in this idea of a good life so then they charged him with corrupting the youth and impiety. This is a result of when it was time to let go of the illusion and face reality. A quote that really stood out to me was, “They’ve been there since childhood, fixed in the same place, with their necks and legs fettered, able to see only in front of them, because their bonds prevent them from turning their heads around.” (Plato’s Republic, 514a.) This quote is so genuine because his whole concept of philosophy is truly explained with these few words. Basically, he is saying that people are so caught up in the illusion that have placed in their minds. People forget to turn their heads and face reality. When Plato says, “with their

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