What Is The Theme Of Violence In All Quiet On The Western Front

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Indian nationalist and iconic leader Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi advocated for peaceful resistance during the Indian fight for independence by saying, “I object to violence because when it appears to do good, the good is only temporary, the evil it does is peramanent.” Interestingly enough, the evidence to support Gandhi’s veiwpoint is pervasive throughout unrelated World War I, which took place between 1914 and 1918. Uncharacteristically called the Great War, World War I was a bloody conflict that erupted out of growing tensions between a complicated string of alliances within Europe. The Allied Powers: France, Britain, Russia, and later Italy and the United States, forcefully responded to Austro-Hungarian and German military movement into …show more content…
Soldiers and countries were driven into the war expecting quick resolution and glorious victory, however in actuality a generation of soldiers was emotionally estranged, the dark of economic depression fell upon much of the world, and feelings of resentment built up in Germany.
Possibly the most devastating immediate consequence of World War I was not the physical death, but the emotional devastation and isolation of a whole generation of European youth - referred to by many artists as the Lost Generation. Erich Maria Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front explores this concept through the eyes of German soldier Paul Baumer, who is off duty and visiting his mother when he reflects, “Ah! Mother, Mother! You still think I am a child - why can I not put my head in your lap and weep? Why have I always to be strong and self-controlled? I would like to weep and be comforted too, indeed I am little more than a child; in the wardrobe still hang short, boy’s trousers - it is such a little time ago, why is it over?” (Remarque 183). This beautiful declaration, riddled with the
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Before World War I, the powerful German army was a reason for German people to love their nation. However, after World War I, the Allied powers, weary of Germany rising up again, limited Germany’s military force by coercing the Germans into signing a document called the Treaty of Versialles (Roush Binder). Articles 159 and 160 in this treaty demobilised much of the German military, reduced it to seven divisions of infantry and three divisions of cavalry, and set strict guidelines for how it could be organized (Treaty of Versailles). This humiliation not only had the intended effect of reducing German political power, but also crushed feelings of German nationalism in much of the population, creating a general feeling of resentment (Roush Binder). Nazi Party leader Adolf Hitler revived national pride by blaming the Jews for Germany’s condition and by promising to rebuild the military to it’s former glory (Rise of Hitler). To completely understand the situation which Hitler rose out of, however, we need to consider Germany’s economic condition. The Allied nations had spent huge sums of money in the war, did not want Germany to rise up again, and were in a position of power. They took this opportunity to economically cripple

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