Alienation In Othello

1123 Words 4 Pages
In many literary masterpieces ‘Outsiders’ are projected as alien characters evoking the curiosity and inquisitiveness of their audience and reader. These mysterious characters are often marginalised from the mainstream society as a result of social prejudice, isolation and their true tragic heroic character. As Othello, Gatsby and Heathcliff are victims, they successfully provide a close insight into the anxieties and conflicts of society in their day by introducing the social stigmas an outsider would have been exposed to in their contemporary times. Othello’s character is a reflection of those victims who in retrospect have tolerated constant racial discrinimation resulting in instability and homicide around the character. Whereas in Brontë …show more content…
Racial discrimination has been prevalent since the dawn of mankind, as those subjected to prejudice merely due to complexity have been portrayed as ‘strange’ and ‘different’. This alienation drives all male protagonists to become outsiders as they initially ‘do not belong to a particular group or organisation’, a disposition of an outsider. In Othello, Shakespeare portrays race as a cultural intrusion as the blend of complexion in the marriage creates tension and uncertainty for the audience. Whereas in Wuthering Heights; Brontë presents Heathcliff as a reformed figure to portray the effects of manipulation when subjected to social prejudice which results Heathcliff to become increasingly insecure. Othello’s intended ethnicity is in some dispute as the definitive article of the ‘moor’ can be applied to the North African descendants who inhabited medieval Spain or the people of ‘barbary’ who still remain in North Africa. This racial difference victimises Othello as the Elizabethan society created a racial ideology in the need to better themselves. The casual racism used here could be argued an inevitable outcome of the colourisation to …show more content…
Both character allude to isolation by having obsessive behaviour, which leads to social reclusion. In Wuthering Heights, Heathcliff’s obsessive behaviour when in love causes others to distant themselves away from him as the aftermath of his lover’s death drives Heathcliff into insanity, which leads to an act of terror. Whereas in Fitzgerald works: he portrays the theme of love through the character Gatsby to convey the determent result of confusing love with lust. By being denied the love, Gatsby obsessively secludes himself trying to put pieces of his past together. The description of Heathcliff when ‘garnishing at me, and foamed like a mad dog’, the melodramatic language creates heightened and expressive emotions to connote the wickedness of their relationship. This may be symbolic of the Victorian Era as those rebellious were presented as animal like. Therefore, Brontë depicts this to endevour how Heathcliff is portrayed as concerning yet spiteful, a factor of an outsider. In Gatsby contrastingly, he is described as a man ‘Nobody from Nowhere’. The alliteration used here creates irony as the harsh insult used depicts Gatsby lower social ranking. Tom does this by comparing Gatsby’s love with ‘interracial marriage’ to display that this love simply cannot function. Therefore, his self-confidence reduces as he is humiliated by the upper class. Fitzgerald uses Gatsby as a motif to show corruption

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