Alienation In Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime And Punishment

1177 Words 5 Pages
In the midst of a visit with his family on page 230 of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, the moment arrives where Raskolnikov must confront the inner turmoil his murders cause, leaving him in such disconnect with his surroundings that he believes he will never be able to express himself with anyone. This inevitably paves the way for irreparable isolation and paranoia, driving him to confess his actions and begin a new life with honesty and love. A couple days after Rodya kills an old pawnbroker and her sister, his own mother and sister come to St. Petersburg, and Raskolnikov is halfway through a frustrating and hesitant dialogue with them when he realizes that his relationship with them, as well as with the rest of the world, including …show more content…
His tumultuous trance throws Raskolnikov into a time of recklessness and foolishness. In a drunken stupor, he encounters a local police clerk in a tavern, and they analyze the murder of the pawnbroker. Raskolnikov proclaims the murderer to be brave and cunning. This act of recklessness portrays his paranoia and carelessness, a contradiction that aptly explains Raskolnikov. Convinced he will be discovered any moment, Raskolnikov would rather muddy the waters of the investigation by questioning the unknown murderer’s identity. Raskolnikov stumbles into the streets and discovers the body of a man he briefly knew. With a valiant surge of adrenaline, he transports the unconscious form of Marmeladov to his apartment where the man’s displeased, anxious wife awaits his return from the vice of drink and his children cower in the corner, victims of their mother’s displaced frustration. Raskolnikov’s morality glimmers through when he provides the family some money, and he meets Sonya, the eldest daughter. By exhibiting a small amount of kindness, Raskolnikov proves himself capable of interpersonal relationships and deeper connections, yet his insistent dolor wears this part of him down, as it is easier to shut everyone out. Henceforth, when Raskolnikov clambers up to his apartment, he reiterates his desire to be …show more content…
Their bond, in his mind, is forged in steel, and it is Sonya who extracts the tiniest bit of humanity and morale from Raskolnikov. Her strong Christian faith allows him to realize a life beyond theory and greatness, beyond anger and loneliness, and beyond the wretched gripes of the common man he always dreaded becoming. Raskolnikov first divulges his crime unto her because he is aware of her kinship with Lizaveta, reminding her of his hidden compassion and scruples. With her continual support, he avows himself to his weeping mother and loyal sister before commencing to the police station. Sonya follows him, and after walking out, he meets her vulnerable, pure gaze and mirthlessly strolls back in to meet his fate. His seven-year sentence develops in him a desire for a normal life free of philosophy and full of serenity with Sonya. Raskolnikov accepts a wooden cross from her, an acceptance of leaving behind his past and encompassing himself in her love and faith. In her presence, Raskolnikov thrusts his problems and angst to the back of his mind, enabling him to speak freely about anything and everything, for they have a strong bond. Forming a close relationship is the first step out of his isolation. Raskolnikov’s

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