Alice Walker Biography

1647 Words 7 Pages
“The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any,” Alice Walker. She is a poor souther girl turned strong activist and phonemail writer. From books, to poetry, to speeches Walker captivated readers and listeners around the world. There are many things to learn about Walker and her famous book The Color Purple. Her life shaped how she wrote. And I believe Walker is an author who never gave up her power. On February 9, 1944, Alice Walker was born in Eatonton, Georgia. She was the youngest girl out of 8 children in a poor family (“Alice Walker Biography”). Willie Lee Walker and Minnie Lou Tallulah Grant were the parents of this amazing writer. Between dairy farming and sharecropping her father only made around …show more content…
She crossed a police line outside the White House during an anti-war rally. She said in an interview that she and others believe that the women and children of Iraq are just like our families. In “We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For,” Walker tells us about the experience. Walker created her own word, in 1983, “womanism”. It stands for “Black Feminism,” and was designed to give black feminists a title to be united under. When Walker refused to allow her book, The Color Purple, to be translated into Hebrew. Dershowitz claimed Walker was anti-semite for the discrimination. However, what Goldberg wrote in 2012 refused that Walker was an anti-semite and stating that Walker was married to a Jewish man. Goldberg stated, “Alice Walker is not boycotting Jews. She is not even boycotting Israelis. She is boycotting the government of …show more content…
The letter format that Walker uses helps to express Celie's character. Celie’s letters include the use of a " folk voice”. An unheard voice in American literature "the voice of the poor, uneducated, world of a Southern black community” (America). The New York Times believes that the “folk voice” in which this is written and the refreshing characters this book make it especially memorable. Writers from the New York Times seemed to like Alice Walker's choice of epistolary style. It allowed them to read of the struggle for independence and equality among African American women, without the emotional baggage (“Some Letters Went to God”). The couple of letters between Celie and Nettie give us a parallel so we understand what happened to Celie's family and how the Olinka tribe in Africa relates to the way black people were treated in America. Thus the use of the letter format and the “folk voice” show us more about the time and keep us interested

Related Documents