Alice Paul Claiming Power Analysis

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Two publications, Alice Paul: Claiming Power by J. D. Zahniser and Amelia Fry, two Paths to equality written by Amy Butler, describe the of path Alice Paul 's private and public life that led to the passing of the 19th Amendment, winning women over the age of 21, the right to vote, and the different viewpoints leading to the same principle of equality for all citizens. However, the scholars have not yet adequately addressed Alice Paul 's role in the passing of the Women 's Suffrage Movement, the Equal Rights Amendment, World War I, and the Civil Rights Act. The gap of information is essential to provide a through history of women and their role in twentieth century America. The research I am working on will fill in the missing gaps of historical …show more content…
The funds of the scholarship were made by an anonymous donor, for the devoted work carried out by the council. The scholarship is awarded to students whose academic career path is unconventional. Unconventional education is one that does not attend brick and mortar schools and is way I qualify for this scholarship. I began my college education a week prior to graduating high school in 1987. I attended college for three semesters, while funding was limited I had to temporary halt my education. As an investment in future college funding I joined the United States Navy, where I invested in the G.I. Bill where I could use upon my discharge from active duty service. While in the Navy I took advantage of the Navy’s tuition assistance program and completed a few college classes. Consequently, when I was discharged my husband was transferred to different geographic area, where I spent a year as a stay at home mom. Nonetheless, my veteran’s benefits provided the means to go back to college, although it was not the G.I. Bill I set out for, but due to an injury’s sustained during my Navy enlistment the Veteran Affairs agency provided the financial support I was able to return to college where I earned a B. A. in History, and a subsequent teaching credential in social science. After earning my teaching credential, I was hired as a history teacher …show more content…
However, to pursue this scholarship, I would become a member. The applicant must have an Associate’s degree, Bachelor’s degree, or a Ph. D prior to submitting the application. The research I intend to complete is Alice Paul’s role during the suffrage movement, equal rights amendment, and her contributions to the Civil Rights Act. My area of research relates to several ideas set out by the CCWH which are categorized in to the topics including women 's studies, women 's history, and Feminist Theory. The categories that my topic applies to may appear abundant. However, locating resources could be somewhat difficult to collect. Conversely, the research scholarship would ease the burden of locating sources throughout the United States by providing funds to travel to the geographic area where I could collect, inquire, and interact with sources not available through database, or archives

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